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Digestive System Study: Hands-On Science For Kids

Nana’s digestive system study lesson offers a hands-on homeschool activity that includes art, science, labeling, handwriting, and vocabulary building. So many ways to learn, all in one lesson! 

The Power Of Art In Science

Kids generally love science because it can be so visual and tactile, as in the case of the natural sciences. Yet much of science explores realms of the unknown that are hidden from our eyes. 

Some of these wondrous worlds are microscopic. While others are difficult to access for easy study, as in the case of the human body. Here we are, walking around as a living scientific specimen, but most of the beauty of human anatomy is internal! Unless your child will one day go to medical school, it is difficult to have a “hands-on” experience with the inner workings of the human body!

Nana’s digestive system study lesson offers a hands-on homeschool activity that includes art, science, labeling, handwriting, and vocabulary building. So many ways to learn, all in one lesson! 

Art can be a valuable tool for understanding and exploring science topics, like human anatomy, that are not readily accessible to the casual scientist. 

Through photographs, diagrams, and artwork, we’re able to explore the hidden mysteries of how our bodies are designed, and how the systems work. Also, let’s be honest, there are many parts of the human body that most of us would rather not touch and explore in reality!

From zooming in on microscopic cells, to the intricate parts of the heart or ear, art gives us access to learning these hard-to-picture body systems. And, it removes the gross-out factor some of us experience!

Beyond access, art just makes learning science FUN because it brings in a familiar, playful activity to the new content! Kids of all ages can pick up a stick of chalk and outline the basic elements of the eye or the digestive system.

Because art helps kids experience science in such a tactile way at their readiness level, kids are more likely to retain the information because the learning becomes an experience, not just another “lesson.”

Digestive System Study For Kids

The other day, my son was resting his head on my stomach while I read a book aloud. Suddenly, he sat up and said, “Your stomach is very noisy!” It was a perfect opportunity to explain the digestive system at work! 

Now, the human digestive system is one of these scientific topics that is not easy for kids to imagine. Plus it is quite complicated. So an art lesson is perfect for exploring the intricacies of this system. Nana with her delightful teaching style makes this detailed drawing accessible for kids. She even named the person she draws “Oscar.” This made my boys giggle! 

Nana’s digestive system study lesson offers a hands-on homeschool activity that includes art, science, labeling, handwriting, and vocabulary building. So many ways to learn, all in one lesson! 

First, Nana walked my boys step-by-step through drawing a body outline, and then filling in the path that food takes through the digestive system from the mouth to the rectum.

Along the way, Nana implements some chalk pastel techniques, like blending the outline of the body to give Oscar a “glow,” and the use of chalk pastel pencils to draw more intricate details. 

While she’s demonstrating how to draw each part, she is naming and discussing some details about the relative size, shape, and location of the parts. Each part gets color-coded, and sometimes Nana will add a little detail, such as how the colon carries waste out of the body. 

Nana’s digestive system study lesson offers a hands-on homeschool activity that includes art, science, labeling, handwriting, and vocabulary building. So many ways to learn, all in one lesson! 

Afterward, she labels each part, so kids get a second chance to learn the names of the parts. If your student is too young for this labeling work, they could just repeat after her, or you as the parent could write in the parts. It might be helpful to pause the video to allow students to keep up, or to have a printed list of parts they can look at for correct spelling. This practice of scientific labeling is a great foundation for future science note booking or developing good study habits. 

A great follow up to this lesson would be to get some books on the digestive system, and learn what each part does! Or maybe complete this video art lesson after you’ve done some reading. 

More Ideas For Hands On Science In Your Homeschool

Our family studies human anatomy about every other year, because it comes up in one of my son’s curriculum or the other. So it’s helpful to have a variety of ways to present some of the same information as the years progress.

We’ve been reading books and articles and watching YouTube videos on human anatomy. Drawing the systems and body parts with chalk pastel is the perfect next step in expressing their learning.

Here’s what I love about the Chalk Pastel I Drew It Then I Knew It series for education: you can use a video either to introduce a topic and generate excitement. Or, you can use a video post-reading or teaching to expand and solidify their learning. You can even do BOTH! Introduce a topic with a chalk pastel video, teach the content, and then ask your child to draw the picture again without the video as a post-learning assessment!

The chalk pastel video art lessons are so versatile, you can use them at any point in your lesson plans! I have been thrilled to see Nana offering an expanding catalog of lessons on the human body via the You ARE an Artist Clubhouse Membership.

If you’re also studying human anatomy or any aspect of the human body, you’ll love to know that Nana has a whole series of lessons and ideas for you: 

The Diagram of the Heart lesson will surely get kids’ hearts pumping for more science learning! 

And of course, who doesn’t love a good old “Mr. Bones” type study of the Skeletal System Activities for Kids

If you want to really wow your kids about what’s happening beyond their vision, dive down into the microscopic world with the Diagram of a Cell.

You could follow that up with the Diagram of an Eye lesson to discuss how our eyesight works, and why it’s limited in scope.

Want them to really sink their teeth into science? Try these Tooth Diagram activities!

You’ll hear them cheer when you tell them they can draw a Diagram of the Ear!

Don’t forget that keeping your body healthy is so important! The Diagram of a Bacterium lesson can introduce kids to the microscopic ways our body takes care if itself and fights off invaders.

You can access all these vibrant art and science lessons and more with the You ARE an Artist Clubhouse Membership. Kids will never want to stop learning when they can paint as they grow their knowledge!

Nana’s digestive system study lesson offers a hands-on homeschool activity that includes art, science, labeling, handwriting, and vocabulary building. So many ways to learn, all in one lesson! 

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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The Periodic Table: Fun Activities For Kids!

In the elementary years, kids often rate science as one of their favorite subjects. After all, who doesn’t love learning about clouds and rain, rocks and volcanos, how the heart pumps blood, and the life cycle of frogs? 

The transition to sciences like physics and chemistry can seem like a departure from the beauty and wonder of biological and physical sciences. Suddenly, students must do long series of math equations and formulas, study complicated charts and graphs, and apply rules and principles. 

Yet, the same hands-on and wonder-based approach kids enjoyed in other sciences is still possible in advanced sciences. The key is to introduce concepts like chemistry and the Periodic Table of Elements in a way that is practical and relatable. 

There’s a saying that goes, “What in the world ISN’T Chemistry?” because everything we see is made up of elements (not necessarily as pure elements, but in their ionic, compound, and mixture forms!). Showing kids where they are most likely to encounter each element makes learning chemistry memorable and practical.

The Periodic Table: Fun Activities For Kids!

The Value Of Adding Art To Science For Kids

It’s one thing to look at a bunch of colored boxes on the Periodic Table. It’s quite another to create colorful flags celebrating each element and its usefulness in our everyday lives! Using art to explore science adds value to the drier facts in the textbook.

Art engages students in learning because it is tactile and interactive. Sure, I’ve had my kids memorize a few of the elements, their name, symbol, and atomic number, but always with some kind of visual cue. When we add art to the mix, now my kids become active in their learning process.  They can take the information coming into their brains and express it on the page—with color! 

The Value Of Adding Art To Science For Kids

The more of the five senses kids use while they are learning, the more memorable the learning becomes. After all, we want these facts to stick in our children’s minds, so they can access the information later when they need it. Adding art to science lessons gives the learning extra value, because kids are layering in another of their five senses.

The Value Of Adding Art To Science For Kids
Introducing The Periodic Table To Kids

Introducing The Periodic Table To Kids

When it comes to learning chemistry, knowing everything on the Periodic Table isn’t necessarily the primary goal. My husband teaches high school chemistry and in his class, he focuses initially on having students learn categories and groupings of elements. He even includes a wee little bit of art by having them color-code a blank periodic table to reflect the different groupings of the elements. Understanding how elements are related and have similar reactions is more important than simply filling out a blank table by rote.

In Nana’s latest addition to the I Drew It Then I Knew It Science series, you’ll find two lessons featuring the very common elements of Sodium and Carbon. 

Practically speaking, most of us will rarely encounter a pure element, like sodium in our day-to-day lives. Kids might hear grownups talking about “watching their sodium” in their food, but that won’t hold much meaning for them.

However, I have not met a kid yet who doesn’t perk up at the mention of french fries! Wait till your kids find out that the element sodium is a huge factor in what makes their drive-through snack so tasty!

Introducing The Periodic Table To Kids
Introducing The Periodic Table To Kids
Introducing The Periodic Table To Kids

As Nana lead my boys through drawing a carton of vibrant golden French Fries studded with savory salt (sodium chloride), they both agreed the entire lesson made them hungry! Nana shared facts about the element sodium as she demonstrated how to paint these savory spuds. I just love how she asks questions right at my kids in her videos. It always makes them stop and think (or at least, they don’t daydream!). Or sometimes, she’ll do a little storytelling, painting a word picture of a scene in which they might find themselves face to face with: Sodium!

Included in the Sodium chalk pastel art lesson were the important details about sodium’s name, symbol, and atomic number. But instead of plunking this information down in a box that looks like all the other boxes on the periodic table, Nana has the kids paint the information onto a flag at the top of their picture. It makes the lesson feel so celebratory! 

The boys also completed the element Carbon video art lesson. In this lesson they learned about this nonmetallic element, and how it is found everywhere from their own bodies to precious gems like diamonds. 

Nana builds excitement by telling kids that Carbon is called “the glue of life.” Plus, she introduces important chemistry terms like “bonding” and “compounds.” I think it’s great for kids to hear these terms when they are younger, so when they get to high school, they will feel more familiar and excited about learning chemistry.

Again, Nana shared background information on the element Carbon. She’s collected facts and speaks of the science of the elements so naturally, that my boys found learning about Sodium and Carbon a fascinating time. 

Drawing a many-faceted diamond that sparkled off the page will certainly be a memorable experience for my kids. I love that Nana takes something that could be dry and flat on the page, and creates a sense of wonder at how we’re surrounded by elements that make up fantastic and priceless things in our world.

Certainly, painting french fries and diamonds was not on my radar when I thought about introducing the periodic table to my kids. But now, I wonder what else Nana will share with students in future Elements lessons!

Introducing The Periodic Table To Kids: Hands on Science Activities
These periodic table activities for kids include the five senses. This makes learning more memorable and fun!

More Hands-On Science Activities

If you think drawing the elements makes science more interesting, just wait until you see the long list (and growing) of science lessons from Chalk Pastel. 

Kids can explore the intricate details of the human body with visually appealing lessons on the skeletal system, cells, bacterium, and various body parts like the diagram of the eye, ear, and heart

If you’re studying biology, try out the many backyard nature art lessons, backyard birds lessons, and even an art lesson on the frog cycle (perfect for spring!).

Astronaut enthusiasts will adore swiping their chalk across black paper to create the planets in the solar system, the moon missions, and more space exploration topics.

Don’t forget to celebrate with art the various scientists and famous inventors who dedicated their lives to exploring the beauty of this world.

Chalk pastel art lessons merge visual and tactile experiences with the solid facts of science study. So you can feel well supported in leading your children through their lessons, knowing they will be delighted to watch and copy Nana’s model instruction.

I’m sure soon they’ll be wondering what other elements of science can they explore through art!

You ARE an Artist video lessons are constantly being added to, and the I Drew It Then I Knew It series come with curriculum workbooks that offer you facts, planners, and other resources. Homeschool families can even design a plan of study in chalk pastel art that will count as high school credit.

Get access to the exciting world of art for any subject in your homeschool by signing up for a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse membership. Nana has created lessons on a diverse range of subjects from History to Literature, Geography to current events! Each lesson is a real treat because of Nana’s calm and encouraging teaching style that captivates and invites young artists to explore knowledge that is right at their fingertips… literally! 

The Periodic Table: Fun Activities For Kids! Make learning more memorable and fun!

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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Skeletal System Activities For Kids: Everything You Need For Learning and Fun!

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Them bones, them bones, them dry bones! Kids love to know about “them bones!” Don’t we all want to know more about what holds us up?

But first, a skeleton joke (because starting learning with a laugh always helps!): 

Why are skeletons so calm? 
Because nothing gets under their skin.

If trying to teach science gets under your skin, you are not alone! I can’t tell you how many times my homeschool friends tell me I am so lucky to be married to a science teacher so he can handle all the science classes. Well, the truth is, you don’t need to know everything to inspire your children’s learning. You just need some great resources. When it comes to the intricate skeletal system, Nana has a video art lesson just for drawing “them bones!” 

Hands-On Learning Activities In Your Homeschool

Although there are 206 bones in the adult human skeleton, it is not hard to learn the major bones in our bodies. For one, so many bones come in pairs or multiples!

For another, Nana’s video art lessons make drawing and labeling a human skeleton fun and engaging. We especially loved switching to black paper for this lesson, which made the finished drawing more striking. 

Another skeleton joke: 

Why did the skeleton have to goto church to play music?
They don’t have any organs!

Although a skeleton has no organs, there are chalk pastel lessons on some of the organs in our body! (more on that down below!) But in the human skeleton lesson, there are no organs at all, just good, strong bones.

As with every chalk pastel lesson we use in our homeschool, I adore how the boys never tire of this type of learning. Using art to learn is such an interactive teaching strategy. 

As kids draw the hip bones connected to the thigh bones, and so on, they are involving 

  • their ears (listening to Nana), 
  • their eyes (watching her draw and then copying), 
  • their hands (drawing), 
  • and the part of the brain that creates mirror images, because the skeleton has many mirrored shapes! 

Using all the senses like this increases comprehension. Kids will retain this learning longer, because so many senses were at work in creating a picture they can label and study!

Hands on learning in your homeschool really is the way to make learning about the human body fun, relaxed, and keep all the information in their lovely round skulls (which is a single large bone! Fun Fact: the skull has one moveable part, which is the mandible). 

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Learning About The Skeletal System

But why learn about the human body anyway? Adding human anatomy study into your homeschool is so important for giving kids a deeper understanding of their own bodies.

When kids learn how intricately the skeleton is designed (there is only ONE bone that is not connected to another bone!), they will develop a sense of wonder at their own body! 

Learning to appreciate the design of the human skeleton will help kids want to take care of their bodies. They need to know why it’s important to eat foods that feed their bones, or how exercise can strengthen their bones. Perhaps those teens will even want to practice good posture, so they can keep their bones functioning properly! 

Plus, human anatomy is part of a well-rounded science education. In science, we learn about the far reaches of space, and the creatures of the deep sea, or how the water cycles works. Yet we live and move in these amazing bodies every second of the day, so we should definitely spend a good amount of time learning the science of how our body works!

After all, without our amazing skeleton, we couldn’t draw with chalk pastels, kick a soccer ball, or play musical instruments! 

What’s a skeleton’s favorite musical instrument? 
The trom-bone.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Skeletal System Activities For Kids

I’ve done a number of skeleton lessons and activities with my kids over the years. We’ve built skeletons out of Q-tips, drawn diagrams of the inside layers of bones, and done experiments to see what chemicals can soften bones (chicken bones, that is!). 

But this was our first time drawing a human skeleton with Nana. This art lesson was perfect for both my fifth grader and seventh grader. I love how students in various grades can adapt this lesson to their level. 

For instance, my fifth grader drew the entire skeleton and then labeled a portion of the skeleton. Younger students might find they need a little extra time to write all those bone names down. That is okay! You can take as much time as you need once the lesson is done to learn the names of each bone. We can either go back and label the rest of the skeleton, or maybe focus on learning just the portion he labeled. 

My seventh grader labeled the entire skeleton right after completing the drawing. This is the beauty of whole family learning with chalk pastel lessons: each student can work to their ability level, and the whole family comes away learning more about the skeleton no matter what! 

I appreciated how Nana’s chalk pastel skeleton lesson covers both the visual aspect of learning about the skeleton (because it’s just FUN to know how to draw a cool skeleton!), as well as the vocabulary element. 

Naming parts of a skeleton is great for building vocabulary. It’s useful know body part names, so you can speak articulately when visiting the doctor. I like how Nana sometimes adds in the “laymen’s term” for some of the bones, discussing the patella as also being called the “kneecap.”

Besides drawing a human skeleton, you can learn so much more about the human body with Nana’s other anatomy lessons. 

Diagram of an Ear 

the ear diagram for homeschool

This colorful lesson teaches kids the three main sections of the human ear. The ear is so intricate and students will learn how beautifully our ear is designed. 

Diagram of a Tooth

tooth diagram for homeschool

Simple to draw, this lesson shows kids all the layers of the tooth. We loved how the tooth is diagrammed in vivid colors to show all the parts of the tooth and gums! Nana’s humor really comes through in this lesson as she discusses each part of the tooth. Maybe it will inspire more dental hygiene as well!

Diagram of the Heart

STEAM learning in homeschool

This intricate lesson doesn’t shy away from detail. Young students will draw a beautiful human heart kids can admire and show off! All the parts are labeled, and this lesson would make a wonderful jumping off point for further study. 

Diagram of an Eye 

Homeschool Science

The eye looks so simple, but has so many parts we cannot see! Nana helps students draw both the outside of the eye and the inner workings of the eye. Plus, students can color their eye to match their own eye color.

Each of these human anatomy lessons involves a good amount of labeling, just like scientists do! These lessons could work at any point in your human anatomy studies:  They are perfect for a starting point for study. Spend your unit studying more about each part you labeled. 

Another way you could include these lessons is by having students complete their drawings in a science journal (because labeling a diagram is key to scientific research!). 

Or, make these lessons a final capstone to a unit on human anatomy. Let students use their drawing to explain what they have learned about human anatomy.

More Resources For Hands-On Science In Your Homeschool

hands on science resources for homeschool

In addition to the human skeleton lesson, the boys also completed the Advances in Medicine lesson. This lesson has kids draw another skeleton, but with extra fun details on the skeleton, and Nana includes some historical references in the lesson.

Hands on Science doesn’t stop with the human body! Nana has already created delightful lessons on cells, bacterium, as well as many other science topics. 

Do you have a space lover? They can draw all the planets in the solar system lessons, the moon missions, and all the exciting aspects of space exploration.

Nature lovers will enjoy any of the backyard nature art lessons, which include many animals. Or, try the many backyard birds lessons. How about a frog cycle lesson for spring?

For STEAM studies, paint pictures of famous inventors, and study their lives and inventions from telephones to electricity, steam engines and airplanes. 

There is science in everything we see and do! And here’s another skeleton joke for you: 

Why didn’t the skeleton go to the scary movie? 
He didn’t have the guts!

Sometimes, designing a program of science study for our kids feels like a scary movie. But learning about science is NOT scary at all with these wonderful chalk pastel art lessons to support your studies, and the delightful and energetic Nana leading your children through learning with art.

Enjoy The Ultimate List of Human Anatomy Art Activities for Hands On Science to browse them all!

Don’t be afraid to blend art and science for a colorful hands-on experience for everyone. The human skeleton and our anatomy is a wonderful place to begin. 

Fill your homeschool with hands-on learning in every subject with a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse membership. This way you’ll have full access to all the video art lessons all the time! No matter what topic you’re studying, be it history, science, music, or literature, you can find a coordinating lesson to engage your learners. Plus, You ARE an Artist is always adding in valuable curriculum workbooks to give you fast facts, lesson planners, and more for your homeschool.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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A Tooth Diagram Activity For Homeschool Science That Will Make You Smile

Here is a tooth diagram activity for homeschool science that will make you smile! There probably aren’t two people who love smiles more than a dentist… and a teacher! As homeschool parents, we envision ourselves leading our children into learning with bright smiles on all our faces. 

Enjoying learning is as important as reaching your learning objective or picking the perfect read-aloud. We want kids to come to learning with a happy curiosity. We want them to leave with a smile of satisfaction. 

Some learning practices are tailor-made to create enjoyable moments of learning. Using chalk pastels has always worked to perk up my children from the doldrums of copywork or chores. 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Hands-On Homeschool Anatomy

Perhaps you’ve heard learning sticks better when multiple senses are involved.

If kids listen to a lecture, they activate their hearing sense only.

If they read a PowerPoint or watch a video while listening, now they’ve involved their sight as well.

If they listen, read, and recite, that’s three senses! And three more chances for the learning to get in!

But don’t forget the most tactile sense of all – using our hands to move, shape, and create as we learn! Adding this fourth layer of sensory exploration to the learning time engages nearly the whole body, as kids get to select colors, sketch lines, and really engage fully with the concepts in front of them. 

Hands-on learning moves children from passively accepting information to active inquiry as they explore with their fingers, eyes, and ears!

When it comes to learning about anatomy, using your hands to create is a fantastic way to show kids how their body is at work for them! Isn’t it great that we actual have a living specimen to study anatomy with: our own bodies! 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Online Tooth Diagram Activity For Your Homeschool

Studying the teeth is an important topic to include in an anatomy lesson. For one, they are a prominent body feature. Also, kids have all kinds of experiences with teeth: smiling, eating, talking, brushing, and… visiting the dentist! Or even getting a visit from the Tooth Fairy!

But, have your kids ever explored the inner world of the tooth? Most kids view of teeth is a simple white molar shape. Below the surface, teeth have so much more going on. You will find that out with Nana’s tooth diagram activity!

online video art lessons

Nana’s chalk pastel video art lesson of the Diagram of a Tooth highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. 

Kids will love tracing the outline of the tooth first, because it activates prior knowledge. Everyone knows what a tooth looks like on the outside. 

Then Nana goes deeper to show students all the layers: pellicle, enamel, dentin, pulp, cementum. As students draw each layer in different colors, it is interesting to see how Nana adds texture to help them visualize each part. Plus they can start to see the relative thickness and size of each layer as well. 

homeschool science lessons
homeschool art lessons for all ages
Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Soon, kids will have drawn a rainbow diagram of the tooth. Then, like the budding scientists they are becoming, they will label each part. This is a wonderful opportunity to add some vocabulary to their word banks, spelling lists, or handwriting worksheets!

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!
Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

When we completed this lesson, our young exchange student from Spain was staying with us. He enjoyed learning all kinds of new English vocabulary as well as understanding more about tooth anatomy. It just goes to show you how accessible Nana’s chalk pastel lessons are, when even an English language learner can easily enjoy them!

Finally, like any good artist, they can name, sign, and date their work of art: the human tooth! This is sure to be a stunning addition to any bulletin board or art journal. They will barely realize they have tucked away a lot of science and anatomy knowledge, because the journey of painting with chalk pastels is so enjoyable. 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Additional Resources For Homeschool Science

Don’t stop with the tooth! Nana has a host of homeschool science resources to keep the learning going. When you have a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse Membership, all of these lessons and the I Drew It Then I Knew It series are at your fingertips all year!

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Homeschool Anatomy & Biology

Homeschool Chemistry & Physics

Homeschool Astronomy

Homeschool Botany

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Whatever your budding scientist wants to discover, there’s sure to be an exciting and colorful chalk pastel lesson to make your homeschool hands-on when it comes to science! Make the learning fun and the learning will stick – and everyone walks away smiling!

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Why STEAM Learning Matters In Your Homeschool

STEAM learning has become a popular topic in education today. The good news is, a STEAM approach to learning can add creativity and innovation to your child’s education. This summary of STEAM learning includes ideas and resources for how to easily and effectively incorporate it into your homeschool.

STEAM learning in homeschool

What Is STEAM?

STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art & Math. It is essentially an integrated learning model designed to help children think more globally and problem solve.

Using STEAM education results in students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. These are the innovators, educators, leaders, and learners of the 21st century! 

Arts Integration.com – “What is a STEAM Education?”

A STEAM approach encourages students to ask questions and think creatively. It is also a great way to help children who typically shy away from topics related to mathematics and technology to engage and learn in a different way!

STEAM Learning

STEAM vs. STEM Learning

STEM learning was a precursor to the STEAM approach. STEM included fundamental subjects including science, technology, engineering, and math. However, in recent years, STEM has been replaced with STEAM.

This is because adding the “A” for art not only fosters increased creativity in these areas, it also supports innovative and more out of the box thinking. Educators report that it is the art component that removes perceived limitations and allows students to fully immerse themselves in more integrated learning.

Homeschool Science

Why STEAM Learning Matters In Your Homeschool

Intentionally adding STEAM learning in your homeschool can be a game changer. Because it creates a more integrated approach to the subjects of study, your child explores and creates in ways that go far beyond a typical worksheet or textbook.

Research shows that STEAM Learning provides the following critical benefits to students:

  • Exposure to the creative process
  • Increases critical thinking
  • Introduces unique problem solving options
  • Provides hands-on learning experiences
  • Shows an increased value and appreciation of the arts

These benefits are just as true for your child and your homeschool!

In my own homeschool, I have found that taking this type of approach has made a significant difference in helping my son think critically, particularly in the area of science and technology. While these two subjects tend to be a bit intimidating for him, weaving art into the various topics allows him to feel connected to the information in a new way.

Moreover, because the learning is more accessible, I find that he not only comprehends more, he retains more as well. We even use a hands-on, STEAM approach in testing!

STEAM learning in homeschool

Examples Of STEAM Learning In Our Homeschool

It can be intimidating to think about adding STEAM into our homeschool days. My experience has been that it’s much easier than I thought. Here are some examples of how STEAM has naturally become a part of my son’s learning.

  1. When my son was studying electricity as part of his science curriculum, we completed a lesson on inventors that used art to depict various scientific discoveries.
  2. As part of our human anatomy study, we are enjoying a hands-on lesson on the human heart, complete with diagramming and art woven throughout.
  3. Our astronomy study included artistic representations of the planets, super nova, and the night sky.
  4. When learning about measurement in math, we used painters tape on the sidewalk outside to physically show the difference between a foot and a meter.

While the idea of STEAM sounds complicated and formal, the reality is that it is actually a much more flexible and child centric way to homeschool. My son loves being able to create as he studies, and I love that he is more successful with the learning because of it.

STEAM learning in homeschool

Resources For STEAM Learning At Home

As I said, I know that STEAM learning can feel a little overwhelming at first for parents. It doesn’t have to be! The beauty of STEAM learning is that it is integrated. This means you cover multiple subjects in just one lesson.

You ARE An Artist has a wide variety of options for creating a STEAM approach in your homeschool (and make it easy on you!). Take a look at a some of the possibilities:

This hands-on homeschool STEAM approach is just the beginning, Chalk Pastel Art offers a variety of STEAM activities your kids will love!

For More Information About STEAM Learning In Your Homeschool.

Why Combine Art and Academics?
How We Use Art as an Alternative to Testing
Homeschool Science and Art Curriculum Match Up

Shawna Wingert, Different By Design Learning

Shawna Wingert is a special education teacher turned writer, speaker and consultant. She is also a homeschooling mom of two brilliant boys with differences and special needs.  Shawna has written four books for parents – Everyday Autism, Special Education at Home, Parenting Chaos and her latest, Homeschooling Your Child With Special Needs. She helps parents of children with learning differences, behavioral challenges and special needs every day at DifferentByDesignLearning.com.