Posted on

Skeletal System Activities For Kids: Everything You Need For Learning and Fun!

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Them bones, them bones, them dry bones! Kids love to know about “them bones!” Don’t we all want to know more about what holds us up?

But first, a skeleton joke (because starting learning with a laugh always helps!): 

Why are skeletons so calm? 
Because nothing gets under their skin.

If trying to teach science gets under your skin, you are not alone! I can’t tell you how many times my homeschool friends tell me I am so lucky to be married to a science teacher so he can handle all the science classes. Well, the truth is, you don’t need to know everything to inspire your children’s learning. You just need some great resources. When it comes to the intricate skeletal system, Nana has a video art lesson just for drawing “them bones!” 

Hands-On Learning Activities In Your Homeschool

Although there are 206 bones in the adult human skeleton, it is not hard to learn the major bones in our bodies. For one, so many bones come in pairs or multiples!

For another, Nana’s video art lessons make drawing and labeling a human skeleton fun and engaging. We especially loved switching to black paper for this lesson, which made the finished drawing more striking. 

Another skeleton joke: 

Why did the skeleton have to goto church to play music?
They don’t have any organs!

Although a skeleton has no organs, there are chalk pastel lessons on some of the organs in our body! (more on that down below!) But in the human skeleton lesson, there are no organs at all, just good, strong bones.

As with every chalk pastel lesson we use in our homeschool, I adore how the boys never tire of this type of learning. Using art to learn is such an interactive teaching strategy. 

As kids draw the hip bones connected to the thigh bones, and so on, they are involving 

  • their ears (listening to Nana), 
  • their eyes (watching her draw and then copying), 
  • their hands (drawing), 
  • and the part of the brain that creates mirror images, because the skeleton has many mirrored shapes! 

Using all the senses like this increases comprehension. Kids will retain this learning longer, because so many senses were at work in creating a picture they can label and study!

Hands on learning in your homeschool really is the way to make learning about the human body fun, relaxed, and keep all the information in their lovely round skulls (which is a single large bone! Fun Fact: the skull has one moveable part, which is the mandible). 

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Learning About The Skeletal System

But why learn about the human body anyway? Adding human anatomy study into your homeschool is so important for giving kids a deeper understanding of their own bodies.

When kids learn how intricately the skeleton is designed (there is only ONE bone that is not connected to another bone!), they will develop a sense of wonder at their own body! 

Learning to appreciate the design of the human skeleton will help kids want to take care of their bodies. They need to know why it’s important to eat foods that feed their bones, or how exercise can strengthen their bones. Perhaps those teens will even want to practice good posture, so they can keep their bones functioning properly! 

Plus, human anatomy is part of a well-rounded science education. In science, we learn about the far reaches of space, and the creatures of the deep sea, or how the water cycles works. Yet we live and move in these amazing bodies every second of the day, so we should definitely spend a good amount of time learning the science of how our body works!

After all, without our amazing skeleton, we couldn’t draw with chalk pastels, kick a soccer ball, or play musical instruments! 

What’s a skeleton’s favorite musical instrument? 
The trom-bone.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Skeletal System Activities For Kids

I’ve done a number of skeleton lessons and activities with my kids over the years. We’ve built skeletons out of Q-tips, drawn diagrams of the inside layers of bones, and done experiments to see what chemicals can soften bones (chicken bones, that is!). 

But this was our first time drawing a human skeleton with Nana. This art lesson was perfect for both my fifth grader and seventh grader. I love how students in various grades can adapt this lesson to their level. 

For instance, my fifth grader drew the entire skeleton and then labeled a portion of the skeleton. Younger students might find they need a little extra time to write all those bone names down. That is okay! You can take as much time as you need once the lesson is done to learn the names of each bone. We can either go back and label the rest of the skeleton, or maybe focus on learning just the portion he labeled. 

My seventh grader labeled the entire skeleton right after completing the drawing. This is the beauty of whole family learning with chalk pastel lessons: each student can work to their ability level, and the whole family comes away learning more about the skeleton no matter what! 

I appreciated how Nana’s chalk pastel skeleton lesson covers both the visual aspect of learning about the skeleton (because it’s just FUN to know how to draw a cool skeleton!), as well as the vocabulary element. 

Naming parts of a skeleton is great for building vocabulary. It’s useful know body part names, so you can speak articulately when visiting the doctor. I like how Nana sometimes adds in the “laymen’s term” for some of the bones, discussing the patella as also being called the “kneecap.”

Besides drawing a human skeleton, you can learn so much more about the human body with Nana’s other anatomy lessons. 

Diagram of an Ear 

the ear diagram for homeschool

This colorful lesson teaches kids the three main sections of the human ear. The ear is so intricate and students will learn how beautifully our ear is designed. 

Diagram of a Tooth

tooth diagram for homeschool

Simple to draw, this lesson shows kids all the layers of the tooth. We loved how the tooth is diagrammed in vivid colors to show all the parts of the tooth and gums! Nana’s humor really comes through in this lesson as she discusses each part of the tooth. Maybe it will inspire more dental hygiene as well!

Diagram of the Heart

STEAM learning in homeschool

This intricate lesson doesn’t shy away from detail. Young students will draw a beautiful human heart kids can admire and show off! All the parts are labeled, and this lesson would make a wonderful jumping off point for further study. 

Diagram of an Eye 

Homeschool Science

The eye looks so simple, but has so many parts we cannot see! Nana helps students draw both the outside of the eye and the inner workings of the eye. Plus, students can color their eye to match their own eye color.

Each of these human anatomy lessons involves a good amount of labeling, just like scientists do! These lessons could work at any point in your human anatomy studies:  They are perfect for a starting point for study. Spend your unit studying more about each part you labeled. 

Another way you could include these lessons is by having students complete their drawings in a science journal (because labeling a diagram is key to scientific research!). 

Or, make these lessons a final capstone to a unit on human anatomy. Let students use their drawing to explain what they have learned about human anatomy.

More Resources For Hands-On Science In Your Homeschool

hands on science resources for homeschool

In addition to the human skeleton lesson, the boys also completed the Advances in Medicine lesson. This lesson has kids draw another skeleton, but with extra fun details on the skeleton, and Nana includes some historical references in the lesson.

Hands on Science doesn’t stop with the human body! Nana has already created delightful lessons on cells, bacterium, as well as many other science topics. 

Do you have a space lover? They can draw all the planets in the solar system lessons, the moon missions, and all the exciting aspects of space exploration.

Nature lovers will enjoy any of the backyard nature art lessons, which include many animals. Or, try the many backyard birds lessons. How about a frog cycle lesson for spring?

For STEAM studies, paint pictures of famous inventors, and study their lives and inventions from telephones to electricity, steam engines and airplanes. 

There is science in everything we see and do! And here’s another skeleton joke for you: 

Why didn’t the skeleton go to the scary movie? 
He didn’t have the guts!

Sometimes, designing a program of science study for our kids feels like a scary movie. But learning about science is NOT scary at all with these wonderful chalk pastel art lessons to support your studies, and the delightful and energetic Nana leading your children through learning with art.

Don’t be afraid to blend art and science for a colorful hands-on experience for everyone. The human skeleton and our anatomy is a wonderful place to begin. 

Fill your homeschool with hands-on learning in every subject with a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse membership. This way you’ll have full access to all the video art lessons all the time! No matter what topic you’re studying, be it history, science, music, or literature, you can find a coordinating lesson to engage your learners. Plus, You ARE an Artist is always adding in valuable curriculum workbooks to give you fast facts, lesson planners, and more for your homeschool.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

Posted on

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Hey, did you hear? Nana has a homeschool science ear diagram activity! This activity is a perfect way to learn the inner workings of the human ear while being creative and a bit messy with chalk pastels.

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear - Hey, did you hear? Nana has a homeschool science ear diagram activity! This activity is a perfect way to learn the inner workings of the human ear while being creative and a bit messy with chalk pastels! #chalkpastels #YouAREAnArtist #homeschhool

Learning About Human Anatomy Made Easy: Diagram the Ear

I love incorporating art into our homeschool studies! It gives us a tactile way to explore information, and for my kinesthetic learner, it helps solidify what he’s learning. This year my high schooler is studying biology. And wouldn’t you know it, Nana has chalk pastels that fit with his course of study! Colorful diagrams are a perfect way to help my teen visualize what he’s learning in a hands-on way.

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Diagram The Ear With This Homeschool Study


Nana’s online video art lessons provide you with all the information you need to create a vibrant diagram. This week my son learned about the inner workings of the ear! All we needed was a pack of construction paper and a starter set of chalk pastels as Nana took us step-by-step on how to draw the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. Then she proceeded to show us how to label each part of the ear diagram correctly.

I love that I could pair Nana’s chalk pastel with our biology textbook! Chalk pastels can be a wonderful compliment to any homeschool curriculum.

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Additional Resources For Science In your Homeschool


Nana has loads of homeschool science resources to keep the learning going. When you have a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse Membership; you’ll have access to over 800 video art lessons. Or you can find all the science lessons in the I Drew It Then I Knew It series!

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Homeschool Anatomy & Biology

Homeschool Chemistry & Physics

  • Inventors Clubhouse (includes the following)
  • Fulton steamboat
  • Henry Ford automobile
  • Nikola Tesla electricity
  • Wright brothers airplane
  • Light Prism – Sir Isaac Newton
  • Benjamin Franklin and electricity
  • Steam railroad engine
  • Samuel Morse telegraph
  • Thomas Edison’s light bulb
  • Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone

Homeschool Astronomy

Homeschool Botany

Plus so much more!

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

No matter what your kiddo may be studying, Nana has a corresponding lesson that can solidify the knowledge in a hands-on way. And I, for one, love the colorful diagrams that pair so beautifully with our homeschool lessons.

Erin is a writer, blogger, and homeschooler to two intense kids. Her blog is filled with information to help you explore a child led education while making meaningful connections with your children. Discover favorite read alouds, seasonal books, games, art projects, hands-on activities, and learn to just breathe through the ups and downs of life. She loves nature, farm life, good books, knitting, new pens, and hot coffee. Erin is a contributing writer for Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers. Her work has also been featured on Simple Homeschool and Book Shark.

Posted on

October Science and Art Activities For Homeschool Learning and Fun

Grab your calendar, chalk pastels, and science loving homeschoolers for these October Science and Art Activities! We’re learning about radio voice messages, telegrams, incandescent lamps, automobiles, space race, and sound barriers – just to name a few cool inventions. Be sure to read about these important dates, October birthdays, and interesting facts.

But first, we couldn’t kick off October without the famous quote by Anne of Green Gables! And, we will end with classic pumpkins.

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”

Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Grab your calendar, chalks, and science loving homeschoolers for these October Science and Art Activities! We are learning about radio voice messages, telegrams, incandescent lamps, automobiles, space race, and sound barriers. Plus Halloween activities.

October Fun Fact

In America we celebrate Thanksgiving the last Thursday in November as the Pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians celebrated their first harvest in 1621. But it was over 200 years later when it was officially recognized as a national holiday! Better late than never? October 3, 1863 – President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation designating the last Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day. Feel free to tuck that away now and pull out around the Thanksgiving table this year. In fact, you will want to make sure to come back to our Thanksgiving Homeschool Lessons: Draw Your Way Through the Story.

Grab your calendar, chalks, and science loving homeschoolers for these October Science and Art Activities! We are learning about radio voice messages, telegrams, incandescent lamps, automobiles, space race, and sound barriers. Plus Halloween activities.

October Science and Art Activities

October Inventions and Art

Can you hear me know?
Trying to pair your science and art lessons? Look at our Science and Art Curriculum Match Up!

Oct 6th Engineer and inventor George Westinghouse (1846-1914) was born in Central Bridge, New York.
October 11, 1939 – Albert Einstein warned President Franklin D. Roosevelt that his theories could lead to Nazi Germany’s development of an atomic bomb. Einstein suggested the U.S. develop its own bomb. This resulted in the top secret “Manhattan Project.”
October 21, 1879Thomas Edison successfully tested an electric incandescent lamp with a carbonized filament at his laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey, keeping it lit for over 13 hours.
October 21, 1915 – The first transatlantic radio voice message was made by the American Telephone and Telegraph Company from Virginia to Paris.
October 24, 1861 – The first transcontinental telegram in America was sent from San Francisco to Washington, addressed to President Abraham Lincoln from the Chief Justice of California.

Not sure how to combine art & science? You will find tips and help in our post Why Art is Essential in Science.

Grab your calendar, chalks, and science loving homeschoolers for these October Science and Art Activities! We are learning about radio voice messages, telegrams, incandescent lamps, automobiles, space race, and sound barriers. Plus Halloween activities.

October Transportation and Art

Everyone is always ready, until it’s time to get in the car. Hopefully folks back in the day were eager to get moving learning about these exciting transportation historic dates.

October 1, 1908 – Henry Ford’s Model T went on sale for the first time.
Inventors STEAM Video Art Lessons
October 4, 1957 – The Space Age began. Russians launched the first satellite Sputnik I into orbit.
This Homeschool Moon Unit Study Is Out Of This World
Oct 8th American fighter pilot Ace Eddie Rickenbacker (1890-1973) was born in Columbus, Ohio. He commanded the first U.S. aero unit to take part in World War I and was credited with 26 victories, becoming America’s leading Ace.
Modern History Video Art Lessons
October 9th Nordic communities worldwide will celebrate Leif Erikson Day – remembering the explorer credited with bringing the first Nordic people to America around the year 1000.
The Ultimate Guide to Medieval History Lessons For Your Homeschool and Medieval Times Homeschool Art


October 13, 1775 – The United States Navy was born after the Second Continental Congress authorized the acquisition of a fleet of ships.
October 14, 1947 – U.S. Air Force Captain Chuck Yeager became the first man to break the sound barrier, flying in a rocket-powered research aircraft. Take Flight With These Famous Aviators
October 26, 1825The Erie Canal opened as the first major man-made waterway in America, linking Lake Erie with the Hudson River, bypassing the British-controlled lower St. Lawrence. The canal cost over $7 million and took eight years to complete.
October 27, 1904The New York City subway began operating, running from City Hall to West 145th Street, the first underground and underwater rail system in the world.
October 27th British navigator James Cook (1728-1779) was born in Yorkshire, England.
October 30, 1990 – For the first time since the Ice Age, Great Britain was connected with the European continent, via a new rail tunnel under the English Channel. Great Britain Themed Chalk Pastel Art (including a map of the British Isles)

Why STEAM Learning Matters in Your Homeschool

October Science and Art Activities: STEAM In Your Homeschool

I thought part of being a “fun homeschool mom” included cleaning up after a Rube Goldberg machine. I wish I would have stuck to chalk art instead. I’m still missing a deck of cards, half the dominoes, and a 5 gallon bucket. Science and Art make a beautiful partnership, read: Why STEAM Learning Matters In Your Homeschool

October in New York

October 24, 1945 – The United Nations was founded.
Oct 27th Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) the 26th U.S. President was born in New York City.
The Best Presidents Day Art Projects For Your Homeschool
October 28, 1886 – The Statue of Liberty was dedicated on Bedloe’s Island in New York Harbor.
A Homeschool Lesson on Artist Steve Penley’s Statue of Liberty.
Oct 28th Dr. Jonas Salk (1914-1995) was born in New York City. In 1952, he developed a vaccine for the dreaded childhood disease Polio.
A Microscopic World Study For Homeschool Science and the Modern Medical Advancements lesson in Nana’s Modern History series.
October 29, 1929 – The stock market crashed as over 16 million shares were dumped amid tumbling prices. The Great Depression followed in America, lasting until the outbreak of World War II.
Homeschool Art Lessons for Your Modern History Buff

October Strong Women and Art

We always loved adding faces to historical dates. The Who Was Series was incredibly helpful bringing history to life in our homeschool. Read as many biographies together or with unit studies and then paint famous historical people with your chalk pastels.

Happy October Birthday to a handful of First Ladies and an American Hero!

Oct 4th Eliza Johnson (1810 – 1876). She was the wife of President Andrew Johnson.
Oct 11th Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) was born in New York City. She was the wife of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd U.S. President.
Oct 13th Molly Pitcher (1754-1832) was born near Trenton, New Jersey (as Mary Ludwig). She was a water carrier at the Battle of Monmouth in 1778 during the American Revolution. After her husband, artilleryman John Hays, collapsed, she took his place at his cannon.
Oct 15th Edith Wilson (1872 – 1961). She was the wife of President Woodrow Wilson.
Oct 26th Hillary Rodham Clinton was born in Park Ridge, Illinois, October 26, 1947.

Add these 7 American History Homeschool Lessons Your Kids Will Love to this year’s curriculum!

7 American History Homeschool Lessons your child will love

October Artists Birthdays

Happy Birthday to the artists, poets, writers, musicians, and creative types who have added color to our world!

Do you have a favorite artist born in October? We enjoy sharing these monthly art projects. Find your favorite artist in this Exploring Famous Artists with Chalk Pastels post or celebrate the October birthdays below.

Oct 9 John Lennon of the rock band The Beatles was born (1940-1980) in Liverpool, England.
Oct 10 Italian opera composer Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901) was born in Le Roncole, Italy. His 26 operas include; Rigoletto, Il Trovatore, La Traviata and Aida, and are among the most popular of all classical music performed today.
Oct 16th American teacher and journalist Noah Webster (1758-1843) was born in West Hartford, Connecticut.
Oct 16th Irish poet and playwright Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was born in Dublin, Ireland.
Oct 16th American playwright Eugene O’Neill (1888-1953) was born in New York City. He wrote more than 35 plays including: Beyond the Horizon, The Iceman Cometh, The Emperor Jones and Long Day’s Journey into Night.
Oct 21st Jazz great Dizzy Gillespie (1917-1993) was born in Cheraw, South Carolina


Oct 22nd Hungarian composer Franz Liszt (1811-1886) was born in Raiding, Hungary.
Oct 25 Artist Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) was born in Malaga, Spain.

Learn more about Picasso with our Famous Artist Pablo Picasso Homeschool Study.

Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up. Pablo Picasso quote, art lesson and podcast.

October Sports and Art

baseball art lesson for the World Series

Take me out to the ball game or just buy me Cracker Jacks, please. Cracker Jacks! The World Series starts October 28th-Nov 5th. Nana added this fun baseball chalk art to go with her Atlanta Braves foam finger. But more importantly for The Games Clubhouse Membership.

Pumpkin Art and Charlie Brown Great Pumpkin for Homeschool

Just in time for fall,  these fun and engaging art projects are perfect for your homeschool! Take a look at all the different options available as you create your own homeschool pumpkin themed study. Pumpkin Art Lessons Perfect for Fall Homeschooling and Easy Acrylic Painting with Nana.

Happy Chalk Art Halloween

Halloween and Anatomy really do complement each other very well. Skeletons and bones. Vampires and circulatory system. So I might take the spook out of it all by getting “educational”, but I couldn’t resist adding an Ancient Egypt lesson to the mummy dogs lunch.

Call me a scaredy cat, or just paint Nana’s NEW black cat and bat masterpieces from the Animals Clubhouse. Erin shares more in her Halloween Homeschooling: Fun, Not Scary Art Activities for Halloween.

homeschool bat resources, art lesson and nature study

More October Homeschool Learning

You might also like:

A special live premiere science lesson is coming for members in October! Be sure to join our email list so you won’t miss the news!

Stef Layton

Stef started homeschooling her boys in 2008. She quickly adopted a hands-on learning homeschool style and graduated her oldest tactile learner in 2021. Stef started the Hands-On Learning column in Homeschooling Today magazine. The Laytons currently reside in the foothills of Colorado where Stef also teaches yoga. The family loves to hike trails, stand-up paddle board, and chase sunsets. Stef shares travel and homeschool tips on IG at @LaytonAdventures.

Posted on

Why STEAM Learning Matters In Your Homeschool

STEAM learning has become a popular topic in education today. The good news is, a STEAM approach to learning can add creativity and innovation to your child’s education. This summary of STEAM learning includes ideas and resources for how to easily and effectively incorporate it into your homeschool.

STEAM learning in homeschool

What Is STEAM?

STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art & Math. It is essentially an integrated learning model designed to help children think more globally and problem solve.

Using STEAM education results in students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. These are the innovators, educators, leaders, and learners of the 21st century! 

Arts Integration.com – “What is a STEAM Education?”

A STEAM approach encourages students to ask questions and think creatively. It is also a great way to help children who typically shy away from topics related to mathematics and technology to engage and learn in a different way!

STEAM Learning

STEAM vs. STEM Learning

STEM learning was a precursor to the STEAM approach. STEM included fundamental subjects including science, technology, engineering, and math. However, in recent years, STEM has been replaced with STEAM.

This is because adding the “A” for art not only fosters increased creativity in these areas, it also supports innovative and more out of the box thinking. Educators report that it is the art component that removes perceived limitations and allows students to fully immerse themselves in more integrated learning.

Homeschool Science

Why STEAM Learning Matters In Your Homeschool

Intentionally adding STEAM learning in your homeschool can be a game changer. Because it creates a more integrated approach to the subjects of study, your child explores and creates in ways that go far beyond a typical worksheet or textbook.

Research shows that STEAM Learning provides the following critical benefits to students:

  • Exposure to the creative process
  • Increases critical thinking
  • Introduces unique problem solving options
  • Provides hands-on learning experiences
  • Shows an increased value and appreciation of the arts

These benefits are just as true for your child and your homeschool!

In my own homeschool, I have found that taking this type of approach has made a significant difference in helping my son think critically, particularly in the area of science and technology. While these two subjects tend to be a bit intimidating for him, weaving art into the various topics allows him to feel connected to the information in a new way.

Moreover, because the learning is more accessible, I find that he not only comprehends more, he retains more as well. We even use a hands-on, STEAM approach in testing!

STEAM learning in homeschool

Examples Of STEAM Learning In Our Homeschool

It can be intimidating to think about adding STEAM into our homeschool days. My experience has been that it’s much easier than I thought. Here are some examples of how STEAM has naturally become a part of my son’s learning.

  1. When my son was studying electricity as part of his science curriculum, we completed a lesson on inventors that used art to depict various scientific discoveries.
  2. As part of our human anatomy study, we are enjoying a hands-on lesson on the human heart, complete with diagramming and art woven throughout.
  3. Our astronomy study included artistic representations of the planets, super nova, and the night sky.
  4. When learning about measurement in math, we used painters tape on the sidewalk outside to physically show the difference between a foot and a meter.

While the idea of STEAM sounds complicated and formal, the reality is that it is actually a much more flexible and child centric way to homeschool. My son loves being able to create as he studies, and I love that he is more successful with the learning because of it.

STEAM learning in homeschool

Resources For STEAM Learning At Home

As I said, I know that STEAM learning can feel a little overwhelming at first for parents. It doesn’t have to be! The beauty of STEAM learning is that it is integrated. This means you cover multiple subjects in just one lesson.

You ARE An Artist has a wide variety of options for creating a STEAM approach in your homeschool (and make it easy on you!). Take a look at a some of the possibilities:

This hands-on homeschool STEAM approach is just the beginning, Chalk Pastel Art offers a variety of STEAM activities your kids will love!

For More Information About STEAM Learning In Your Homeschool.

Why Combine Art and Academics?
How We Use Art as an Alternative to Testing
Homeschool Science and Art Curriculum Match Up

Shawna Wingert, Different By Design Learning

Shawna Wingert is a special education teacher turned writer, speaker and consultant. She is also a homeschooling mom of two brilliant boys with differences and special needs.  Shawna has written four books for parents – Everyday Autism, Special Education at Home, Parenting Chaos and her latest, Homeschooling Your Child With Special Needs. She helps parents of children with learning differences, behavioral challenges and special needs every day at DifferentByDesignLearning.com.

Posted on

Human Heart Activity For Kids: Hands-On Homeschool Science

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It’s a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

“Where science does not teach a child to wonder and admire it has perhaps no educative value.”

Charlotte Mason, Philosophy of Education, p. 224

The Value Of Hands-On Science In Your Homeschool

Science is multi-faceted.  It manifests itself in multiple ways and is captivating. Have you ever watched a child carefully observe living science? Every day, the natural world sends delightful invitations, asking one to unwrap all the tiny miracles it offers. At tender ages, before a budding learner carries the ability to read or write, their senses allow them to appreciate the wonders set before them. A child’s curiosity ignites as a spider’s web catches tiny droplets of rain, mirroring an array of fresh morning dew. 

Hands on science with snails

Their thoughts awaken as tentacles shyly emerge, uncovering the secrets of what lies inside their delicate shell.  Learning  sparks  as a  butterfly emerges from its chrysalis, spreading its newborn wings for the very first time.

A brainstorm (as my son calls it) happens when an experiment calls for creating clouds or discovering the wavelengths of light.  

Implementing hands-on homeschool science cultivates the thirst to learn and encourages critical thinking skills. With careful nurturing, a child is able to carry these special learning experiences with them as they grow. Simply put, science fosters life-long learning and is interdisciplinary in nature.

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

Human Heart Activity For Kids

Let’s step into four important chambers to uncover one of Nana’s newest interdisciplinary science lessons! This one will surely get your blood pumping.  At the heart of this study is a beautiful presentation of one of the most vital organs of the human body.

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

Nana’s human heart anatomy highlights science, art, writing, diagramming, and an exposure to brand new vocabulary; a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

This wonderful homeschool art lesson in intriguing to young anatomists and is an engaging way to capture the heart of the human body.

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

More Resources For Hands-On Science

Delightful art brings a beauty to our home, and attached to each masterpiece is a measure of pleasant memories filled with the sweet smells of Nana’s apple pie and busy little hands covered in rich colors. This memorable learning goes beyond just the art lessons.

Art with Nana shares one of the most important pieces of home education, learning alongside my children.  We have had so much fun and created such colorful memories with many of Chalk Pastel Art’s science resources. They all pair well with any science curricula, unit studies, and books!

More resources for hands on science

Do you have an astronomer who is interested in unlocking the mysteries of the universe? Check out Nana’s and Tricia’s astronomy lessons! These paintings take you deep into space focusing on the solar system. Hands-on and multi-sensory, the fascinating art brings a stunning demonstration of the world beyond our galaxies.

We coupled the art lessons with You ARE an ARTiST’s kid-friendly Companion Workbook. This guide is easy to use, organized, and packed with wonderful information relating to the solar system.  The Five Facts and NASA links were our favorite pieces in the Companion Workbook. If you are interested in building an engaging solar system study, combine the Companion Workbook with a few books from the provided booklist. Then add the art lessons that are out of this world!

If you have an anatomist on your hands, take a look at these art lessons that go perfectly with a human body unit! Filled with lots of color, vocabulary, and labeling, your anatomist will take a sneak peek into the wonders inside the eye in a Microscopic Science Study and bacterium with Small But Mighty Cell Activities For Your Homeschool.

Spend a few moments outdoors looking at the spread of colors sprinkled across the woodlands. Enjoy plant life with your future botanist by observing a few flowers. Then, draw your sweet nature time to a close by painting with Nana. This art lesson will bring your naturalist such pleasure by drawing and labeling the parts of a bright daffodil.

Do you have a student who just can’t wait to  explore marine life? If so, you might want to spend time putting your feet in the sand and listening to the rhythmic waves with Nana! With a Majestic Ocean Study, she will take your marine biologist along sandy beaches to build sand castles and uncover the fascinating life beyond the sea! Bring your sand buckets and all colorful pastels!

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

All the hands-on homeschool science fun doesn’t end here! It’s just the beginning! Chalk Pastel Art offers many art adventures that combine perfectly with all ages and with any hands on science activity. Check out all the wonderful ways art coupled with science can work in your family with this Science and Art: A STEAM Curriculum Match Up.

Jamie Gault

Jamie is the author of A Brown Bear’s Language Arts Study, a literature-inspired homeschool mom of eight, and a former educator. She enjoys a bookshelf bursting with colorful picture books  and children’s stories of all genres. Indulging in a read aloud with all of her children around her is one of Jamie’s favorite moments of her days. Be sure to find Jamie on Instagram and visit her blog, Treasuring the Tiny Moments Homeschool, to be encouraged by all her learning adventures with her wonderful family.

Posted on

Small But Mighty Cell Activities For Your Homeschool

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. In fact, online cellular biology lessons are an excellent addition for your homeschool science. Take a look!

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

When it comes to making learning fun, homeschool parents don’t have to look far. Kids are fascinated with what makes them…well, them! They love to see the inner workings of things. What is more intricate and endlessly fascinating than the human body? 

Cells are like mini-worlds unto themselves. They make up our very existence, yet they exist beyond our eyesight. This whole “universe” of cells is a captivating world to explore through hands-on activities like experiments, crafts, and art! Consider these small but mighty cell activities as you plan your homeschool science curriculum. 

Make Learning About Cells Fun

What’s more hands-on than the human body? We all have one, right? Kids will be engaged by what they can learn by simply observing their own body. When our family studied human anatomy, my boys loved that they used their bodies as part of the experiments and activities. 

Yet as much as we can observe so much of the human body’s wonder from the outside, it’s a million times more astounding to consider what goes on at the cellular level! 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Cell Activities For Your Homeschool

Want to give your kids insight into the microscopic world beyond our sight, but right below our skin (and on and in it too!)?

  • Enlarge the cell
  • Model the cell
  • Watch the cell in action
  • Draw the cell
These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Enlarge the cell.

You probably eat single cells for breakfast! Yes, a chicken egg starts out as a single cell. Show your child an egg, and explain to them the simple parts of a cell: the cell wall, membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus can all be “seen” in a cracked egg!

Model the cell.

Now that kids have a sense of the major parts of a cell, dive deeper into some of the smaller pieces. In our study of cells, we created an edible cell using gelatin and candies. So fun and delicious. You’ll need a package of jello, a bowl, and a variety of small candies to represent the organelles (parts of a cells) like the mitochondria, golgi bodies, ribosomes, and more. 

You can find a detailed edible cell model to follow here

jello model for homeschool cell activities

Watch cells in action.

Show your kids the “cellular highway” of capillaries and veins that your blood cells travel on. One quick (and to my boys, humorous) way to do this is by shining a flashlight under their tongues while they look in a mirror. There, they will spot a “roadmap” of multicolored veins that give a glimpse of how special cells like blood cells travel around the body!

We even made a model of the blood using corn syrup, candy red hots, and candy sprinkles. Have you kids mix this up to see how various cells are different sizes and how they travel through plasma. 

Draw the cell.

In Nana’s newest I Drew It Then I Knew It series, kids get hands on with science by painting and labeling a diagram of some of our smallest parts! 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Online Cellular Biology Lessons Perfect For Your Homeschool Study

Whether you’re studying human body cells, plant cells, or the chemical makeup of our world, these science art lessons will fit your homeschool science. 

Nana has included a wonderful “opener” lesson in her Lab Coated Scientist class. My oldest created a painting of a scientist researching in a book, with swirling scientific symbols above his head. While this scientist is drawn as a chemistry teacher by Nana, my oldest changed the book to read “Biology” to match our current science studies. He replaced Nana’s chemical notations with a DNA strand and a bacterium! Kids can be so creative with these lessons. 

This scientist painting would be perfect to have as a cover for any note booking or portofolio of your child’s work. 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Diagram A Cell

After doing some of the hands-on activities above, have your child paint and Diagram a Cell. Nana does a wonderful job of helping students visualize the cell through their chalk pastel “microscope” as they look for the cytoplasm, nucleus, mitochondria, and cell membrane. If your students have learned other parts of the cell, why not have them include this knowledge into their drawing as well. This video art lesson is the perfect choice to add to a science journal or notebooking collection. 

Diagram Bacterium

The colorful Diagram of a Bacterium lesson helps kids learn about another kind of cell that can be lurking in your body. Whether harmful or helpful, bacteria exists everywhere, and yet is a different kind of cell than what makes up your body structure. After this lesson, kids can discuss proper hygiene (here’s a free hand washing printable you can use!), proper nutrition (talk about probiotics in their yogurt!), and discuss which kinds of bacteria are harmful or helpful.

diagram of bacterium
These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Diagram of an Eye

Diagram of an Eye helps students learn the various parts of the eye. What is special about this lessons is how students get to label the eye as we see it, and as it looks from inside the body!

Biology and Chemistry

DaVinci’s Vetruvian Man painting makes a great finish to a series on the human body. This makes a wonderful lesson in the proportions of both artwork and the human body. As you sketch out the  dive into the concept held by this Old Master that “everything is connected.” Our cells are microscopic, but work together to create a larger system. In the same way, people are smaller parts of God’s much larger universe. 

The Light Prism with Sir Isaac Newton lesson would be a fantastic intro lesson for studying chemistry and physics. Is it so beautifully colorful and symmetrical, you will want to frame this artwork after your kids create it!

For additional scientific artwork, try the Daffodil lesson where kids will paint a gorgeous yellow daffodil with their chalks and label the parts of a flower. You might revisit your cell painting and discuss how a plant cell is slightly different than an animal/human cell. 

More Homeschool Science Lessons From You Are An Artist

Science doesn’t end with the human body, of course. Our boys have enjoyed so many science lessons from Chalk Pastel. 

For a great Astronomy study, the Hubble Space Telescope Lesson can be a jumping off point for a Space unit. Follow it up with any of the Space Exploration Clubhouse lessons, but my favorites would be the Spiral Galaxy and the Nebula lessons. Students can draw all the planets in the Milky Way with the Solar System Clubhouse lessons. 

If you’re studying Physics, you should check out the Electric Light and Electric Lightning lessons!

For an Earth Science study, you’ll love the volcano, tornado, and northern lights video art lessons. 

Studying habitats? Draw a Marsh or paint the habitat Under the Sea

A study of Zoology might use any of the dozens of animal art lessons from Nana. Frogs are always a great place to start because they are a great animal for discussing life cycles. The John James Audubon lesson plus the Birds Clubhouse lessons are also wonderful for Biology and Zoology studies. 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Each science-themed art lesson from Nana focuses on a science concept that opens a door for further investigation, study, and discussion. Nana does such a wonderful job of dropping “breadcrumbs” of interesting and relevant facts as she gives her chalk pastel instruction. 

I am always amazed at how much a simple painting session can spark a deeper level conversation with my boys. Even if you only select a single video art lesson to complement your science studies, these lessons are small but mighty cell activities you’ll want to include in your homeschool science!

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

Posted on

A Microscopic World Study For Homeschool Science

Homeschool Science

Science, it’s one of those love-it-or-hate-it subjects in homeschooling. Teaching homeschool science and facilitating experiments at home might make you feel a little overwhelmed. There are so many exciting ways to teach and learn about science together at home.  This microscopic world study is a great example!

An excellent way to get your children excited about science can be through exploring the microscopic world. #homeschoolscience #microscopicstudy #sciencecurriculum #sciencestudy

Seeing Our World Through The Microscope

An excellent way to get your children excited about science can be through exploring the microscopic world. Seeing things through a microscope opens a whole new world of scientific knowledge for children. 

Since most children have a visual or kinesthetic (hands-on) learning style, studying with microscopes and diagramming is an excellent way to learn science. Not only that, it’s a lot of fun! 

So if homeschool science experiments aren’t your thing yet, you should try an exploration of the microscopic world. Your kids are sure to love it and learn so much along the way. 

Homeschool Science

The best part is that you don’t even need a microscope at home to enjoy these studies. If you have one handy, that’s awesome! But don’t fret if you don’t. Nowadays, you can effortlessly search for what you want to see through a microscopic lens, and you can likely find images and even videos of it on the internet. 

You may want to set up a microscopic world study and look closely at all of these marvelous things the human eye can not see. There are many options to explore under a microscope, insects, cells, salt, hair, onion, mold, flower parts, leaves, sea sponge, spider webs, pond water, and tons more!

Homeschool Science

Microscopic World Study And Exploration For Your Homeschool

If you are ready to embark on a scientific journey with Nana, she is waiting with some unique new lessons that are sure to please. Nana has created the perfect homeschool science art lessons to add an artistic and hands-on element to your science studies. Who says science is boring? It’s definitely not with Nana in the I Drew It Then I Knew It Clubhouse. 

We love how YOU ARE AN ARTiST keeps adding fun hands-on art lessons to pair with everything we are learning in our homeschools. (If you don’t have a membership yet, I highly recommend adding one to your homeschool. You will get so much value from it for almost every subject in your homeschool, including science.) It’s one of my favorite ways to keep our homeschool fun and exciting for all of my kids. 

Homeschool Science

So whether you have a complete science curriculum or no science curriculum at all, you can use these hands-on homeschool science lessons. You can pair these microscopic homeschool science diagramming lessons with your science curriculum. Or use a resource that allows you to explore your particular interests and pair Nana’s homeschool science lessons with them! Either way, these are easy to do, and your kids will be so glad that you did. 

Nana loves maps, and diagramming is like maps for anatomy and cells. Combining art and science by diagramming is brilliant because you can also expand on vocabulary, handwriting, and spelling for elementary. 

Homeschool Science

Diagram of a Cell 

There are many creative ways to learn about cells for all ages, and this Diagram of a Cell art lesson is perfect as a stand-alone lesson or to accompany that cell cake or cells made of jello. It’s a wonderful way to learn more about cells, and if you don’t like all the messy aspects of cell cakes and the like, you can just stick with paper and chalk pastels.

Homeschool Science

Diagram of a Bacterium

Another easy way to learn more about homeschool science is to add a Diagram of a Bacterium art lesson. Learning about science through text or your curriculum is great but adding a hands-on element like art boosts your kids’ science knowledge. 

Diagram of the Eye & Eyeball 

My kids loved this one! Diagramming the eye is such an exciting way to bring your science lesson to life! We added the DK Smithsonian Human Body Book to our science studies; it has fantastic images to explore as you learn together. It is one of those resources that are great to use in place of an entire science curriculum if you haven’t chosen one yet or to allow the kids to find their own interests to pursue. 

Homeschool Science

Diagram of a Daffodil

The Diagram of a Daffodil was also a favorite in our homeschool this week! We love to explore nature, and combining art makes it even more delightful. It is always a treat to revisit the parts of a flower and we included Julia Rothman’s Nature Anatomy book for this one too!

Homeschool Science

More Online Homeschool Science Lessons

Here are even more homeschool art lessons you can add to your homeschool science studies. Remember, there is no right or wrong way to study anything. Keep it simple and have fun learning together!

  • Vitruvian Man – Leonardo da Vinci
  • Light Prism – Sir Isaac Newton
  • Lab-Coated Scientist
  • Total Solar Eclipse
  • Solar System 
  • Perseids
  • Through the Telescope
  • Moon Missions
  • Comet 
  • Spiral Galaxy
  • and many, many more!
Homeschool Science

Nature Science Art Lessons

  • Red-Eyed Tree Frog
  • Snail 
  • Deer in the Forest
  • Rat Snake
  • Eagle’s Nest
  • Dandelion
  • Ant
  • Cicada
  • Sharks

Courtney is a Jesus-pursuing, native Texan, homeschool mom of three, and she believes homeschooling can be a peaceful and productive rhythm. At Grace, Grow & Edify she helps families create peaceful homeschooling atmospheres through faith, organizational strategies, and cultivating strong roots at home. She is also the founder of Homeschool Mastery Academy.

Posted on

Integrated Art For Homeschooling High School

Are you looking for ways to create a more dynamic learning environment for your high schooler? Homeschooling with an integrated art approach may be exactly what you need!

What Is Integrated Art?

An integrated art curriculum is one in which the art becomes the approach to teaching and the vehicle for learning.

“Students meet dual learning objectives when they engage in the creative process to explore art and another subject to gain greater understanding in both.”

Institute for Art Education and STEAM

Put simply, integrated art allows the learner to engage in the subject matter in a way that is much more robust and cross-functional. The student accesses the learning with a non-traditional, yet highly effective approach, using art as the method of delivery.

integrated art

Why Is It So Helpful In Homeschool High School?

As more and more complex learning is expected for high schoolers, for many students, there is a need to access learning in a different way.

Not all learners respond well to the traditional textbook, worksheet, lecture style of traditional learning.  In fact, most do better with a more multisensory approach to learning.

Integrated art essentially takes subjects we traditionally teach in a more formal way, and immediately adds a layer of accessibility and hands-on learning.

The Foundations Of An Integrated Art Curriculum

The truth is, most of us are already quite familiar with this approach to learning. It is likely that you have a memory of this type of learning from your childhood, as integrated art is more readily accepted and woven into elementary education.

For me, it was a salt map I made of Italy for my country report in sixth grade. I worked hard on that map, and through it’s creation, I learned more about Italy than any textbook ever would’ve taught me. I also retained the information I learned about Italy. (In fact, to this day, I still remember most of what I learned – that’s the power of hands-on, multisensory learning!)

integrated art

You Are An Artist For High School Homeschool

You Are An Artist lessons are exactly what an integrated art curriculum is all about.

What makes it particularly effective, is that You Are An Artist includes this type of approach all the way through the high school years.

For example, when my son was learning about US History, we completed a lesson on creating our own map of North America.

The opportunities to learn with an integrated art perspective are plentiful with You Are An Artist.

Take a look at all of these high school level courses.

Integrated Literature and Language Arts For High School

  • Harry Potter
  • Stopping by the Woods – Robert Frost
  • The Hobbit
  • Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre
  • Lamp Post – Narnia C. S. Lewis
  • Hundred Acre Wood – A.A. Milne
integrated art for homeschool

History and Geography For High School Homeschooling

  • American History
  • American Landmarks
  • Ancient History
  • Famous Composers
  • World Maps
  • World Landmarks

Science For High School With You ARE An Artist

  • Inventors
  • Moon Missions
  • Solar Eclipse
  • Solar System
  • Space Exploration

(You can also read all about how to use You Are An Artist specifically for High School Art credit and grab a FREE Visual Art Credit Tracker HERE)

integrated art for your homeschool

Integrated Art In Your Homeschool Curriculum

Using integrated art in any homeschool curriculum is valuable. Adding it to the high school years keeps learning fun, engaging, and ultimately, more successful.

Thankfully, You ARE An Artist has everything you need to easily include integrated art in your homeschool.

Shawna Wingert

Shawna Wingert is a special education teacher turned writer, speaker and consultant. She is also a homeschooling mom of two brilliant boys with differences and special needs.  Shawna has written four books for parents – Everyday Autism, Special Education at Home, Parenting Chaos and her latest, Homeschooling Your Child With Special Needs. She helps parents of children with learning differences, behavioral challenges and special needs every day at DifferentByDesignLearning.com.

Posted on

Why Art Is An Essential Part Of Science In Our Homeschool

I learned a long time ago that my son learns best with a multi-sensory approach. His comprehension and retention is so much greater when we focus on the more experiential aspects of a particular topic.

The problem is, sometimes, it’s really challenging to find ways to engage his need for hands-on learning. In fact, for many years, I spent hours scouring the internet, looking for creative ways to enhance our textbook learning.

When I found the academic videos included in You ARE an ARTIST I was excited, but more so, relieved. I could take the subjects we were already studying in more formal ways and instantly make them more engaging for my kiddo, just by clicking play and letting Nana do the teaching!

While we have used You ARE An ARTIST across many different subjects, including nature study, language arts and history, this year, we are incorporating it into our science study. I continue to be grateful for the support it provides for my sons’ learning needs and today, I want to share a bit of how it works for us.

How We Make Art A Part Of Science

You ARE an ARTIST offers several different video courses that align well with many traditional scientific studies.

For example, we completed the Shark Art lessons as a part of our Marine Life and Oceanography Study. We also did the I Drew It Then I Knew It Inventor course as we completed a unit on electricity.

This year, we are starting off with an astronomy study and including the many chalk pastel courses as part of our learning. Again, this helps to solidify any reading or more formal learning we complete, by allowing my son the opportunity to engage with the topic in much more creative and hands-on way. (We have also use art as a way to “test” what my son has really learned and will again with this unit.)

Here is a snapshot of what I have planned for the first two weeks of this particular science unit:

Week One

Day One: Look at and discuss a poster of the solar system

Day Two: Read about the planets

Day Three: Complete You ARE An Artist Video Tutorial – Saturn (While we both follow the lesson, my son and I will discuss what we have learned so far about Saturn in particular and the planets in general.)

Week Two

Day One: Watch YouTube Video about Haley’s Comet

Day Two: Read about comets and meteorological events

Day Three: Complete You ARE An Artist Video Tutorial – Haley’s Comet (While we both follow the lesson, my son and I will discuss what we have learned so far about Saturn in particular and the planets in general.)

The Art In Space Video Course Super Bundle has 17 video tutorials all about the solar system, space exploration, comets, super novum and more. I will add more astronomy topics as we progress through our textbook and incorporate more of the bundle’s art videos accordingly. By the time we are finished up with the astronomy book, we will have covered six full weeks of study – and we will have had fun doing it!

Here is Why Art Is An Essential Part Of Science in Our Homeschool. I can't imagine a better way to learn science in our homeschool. This approach has made all the difference in helping my child engage in what we are learning and retain it as well. By Shawna Wingert

Why Art Is An Essential Part Of Science In Our Homeschool

This approach has made all the difference in helping my child engage in what we are learning and retain it as well. He can tell you a lot more about electricity, not only because we read about it in a book, but because we discussed it as we created our own chalk pastel art all about it. I imagine the same will be true for astronomy once all is said and done.

It works well for my child, but the truth is, it also works well for me. The planning is easier and the lessons are already defined. All I have to do is get out the art supplies and relax.

I can’t imagine a better way to learn science in our homeschool.

You might also like:

Shawna Wingert is a special education teacher turned writer, speaker and consultant. She is also a homeschooling mom of two brilliant boys with differences and special needs.  Shawna has written four books for parents – Everyday Autism, Special Education at Home, Parenting Chaos and her latest, Homeschooling Your Child With Special Needs. She helps parents of children with learning differences, behavioral challenges and special needs every day at DifferentByDesignLearning.com.

Posted on

Homeschool Science and Art ? A STEAM Curriculum Match Up

Have you ever considered a homeschool science and art curriculum match up to create a wonderful learning environment? Art adds a hands on layer of engagement that can help solidify and enhance science homeschool learning in both a fun and beautiful way. There are so many benefits to incorporating an I Drew It Then I Knew It approach when you combine science and art!

This summer, we are enjoying Apologia’s Exploring Creation with High School Astronomy course. The warm months are a perfect time for stargazing and learning more about God’s amazing universe.

Adding STEAM Learning To Your Homeschool With Science And Art

We are following up our Apologia Astronomy studies with art.

This is because of all we have been learning about the value of taking a STEAM approach to education.

STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math and is an interdisciplinary learning model that helps inspire critical thinking, creativity and increasing confidence. Matching up science and math is an obvious choice!

It is so much fun to paint what you learn with brilliant colors on black construction paper! We discovered this several years ago when we enjoyed Exploring Creation with Astronomy at the elementary level. We are thrilled Apologia now has this high school level elective Astronomy course.

How Science and Art Curriculum Match Up in Your Homeschool

Charlotte Mason believed art should be a staple in every child’s education, and she explains a simple way to make it easy and effective. She felt it was the educator’s job to awaken, hone and even increase a child’s creativity: Art the Charlotte Mason Way

Jeannie Fulbright

Here are more examples of how science and art create a lovely learning environment together:

  • Why Art is an Essential Part of Science in Our Homeschool – For example, we completed the Shark Art lessons as a part of our Marine Life and Oceanography Study. We also did the I Drew It Then I Knew It Inventor course as we completed a unit on electricity. This year, we are starting off with an astronomy study and including the many chalk pastel courses as part of our learning. Again, this helps to solidify any reading or more formal learning we complete, by allowing my son the opportunity to engage with the topic in much more creative and hands-on way. (We have also used art as a way to “test” what my son has really learned and will again with this unit.)
  • Why Adding Art to Academics Helps Children Learn – The audio of Nana’s instruction, the visual input from the computer screen and from the colors as my child paints, as well as the obvious tactile experience of holding the chalk and blurring the lines on the page – all work together to create a seamless, multi-sensory experience for my son. This type of multisensory learning leads to greater comprehension and retention for all children, and especially those who have learning differences.
  • Matching Nana’s You ARE an Artist video art lessons to your homeschool science curriculum just got even easier! We have a handy, dandy Homeschool Science Curriculum Match Up Checklist. All of Nana’s I Drew It Then I Knew It science and her nature video art lessons are listed – including inventors, space and more! This homeschool science and art curriculum match up checklist has plenty of planning space for you to add your corresponding science lesson or to jot down a date, note or page number.

Astronomy Art Lesson – Through the Telescope

Enjoy Nana’s Through the Telescope art lesson, in celebration of Apologia’s High School Astronomy course! This astronomy art lesson is pictured above and is a sample from Nana’s I Drew It Then I Knew It Solar System course in the You ARE an ARTiST Complete Clubhouse.

Suggested supplies: Black construction paper and all the chalk pastel colors! Baby wipes or slightly damp paper towels for easy clean up.

After you enjoy this lesson, be sure to tag us on Instagram @chalkpastelart or send us a photo. We can’t wait to see!

Additional Homeschool Resources For Science And Art

You ARE An Artist has a wide variety of options for continuing with a STEAM approach in your homeschool. Take a look at all of these possibility for combining science and art!

  • Inventors
  • Moon Missions
  • Solar Eclipse
  • Solar System
  • Space Exploration

Growing a love of art at You ARE an ARTiST is a multi-generational passion! Tricia is Nana’s daughter and a mama of five children. Nana shared her first chalk pastel art lessons with her grandchildren around Tricia’s kitchen table. Homeschooling since 2000, Tricia has seen the fruits of home education with three homeschool grads so far! She shares the art and heart of homeschooling at Hodgepodge and is author of the book, Help! I’m Homeschooling! She and her husband, Steve, are also owners of The Curriculum Choice.