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Skeletal System Activities For Kids: Everything You Need For Learning and Fun!

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Them bones, them bones, them dry bones! Kids love to know about “them bones!” Don’t we all want to know more about what holds us up?

But first, a skeleton joke (because starting learning with a laugh always helps!): 

Why are skeletons so calm? 
Because nothing gets under their skin.

If trying to teach science gets under your skin, you are not alone! I can’t tell you how many times my homeschool friends tell me I am so lucky to be married to a science teacher so he can handle all the science classes. Well, the truth is, you don’t need to know everything to inspire your children’s learning. You just need some great resources. When it comes to the intricate skeletal system, Nana has a video art lesson just for drawing “them bones!” 

Hands-On Learning Activities In Your Homeschool

Although there are 206 bones in the adult human skeleton, it is not hard to learn the major bones in our bodies. For one, so many bones come in pairs or multiples!

For another, Nana’s video art lessons make drawing and labeling a human skeleton fun and engaging. We especially loved switching to black paper for this lesson, which made the finished drawing more striking. 

Another skeleton joke: 

Why did the skeleton have to goto church to play music?
They don’t have any organs!

Although a skeleton has no organs, there are chalk pastel lessons on some of the organs in our body! (more on that down below!) But in the human skeleton lesson, there are no organs at all, just good, strong bones.

As with every chalk pastel lesson we use in our homeschool, I adore how the boys never tire of this type of learning. Using art to learn is such an interactive teaching strategy. 

As kids draw the hip bones connected to the thigh bones, and so on, they are involving 

  • their ears (listening to Nana), 
  • their eyes (watching her draw and then copying), 
  • their hands (drawing), 
  • and the part of the brain that creates mirror images, because the skeleton has many mirrored shapes! 

Using all the senses like this increases comprehension. Kids will retain this learning longer, because so many senses were at work in creating a picture they can label and study!

Hands on learning in your homeschool really is the way to make learning about the human body fun, relaxed, and keep all the information in their lovely round skulls (which is a single large bone! Fun Fact: the skull has one moveable part, which is the mandible). 

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Learning About The Skeletal System

But why learn about the human body anyway? Adding human anatomy study into your homeschool is so important for giving kids a deeper understanding of their own bodies.

When kids learn how intricately the skeleton is designed (there is only ONE bone that is not connected to another bone!), they will develop a sense of wonder at their own body! 

Learning to appreciate the design of the human skeleton will help kids want to take care of their bodies. They need to know why it’s important to eat foods that feed their bones, or how exercise can strengthen their bones. Perhaps those teens will even want to practice good posture, so they can keep their bones functioning properly! 

Plus, human anatomy is part of a well-rounded science education. In science, we learn about the far reaches of space, and the creatures of the deep sea, or how the water cycles works. Yet we live and move in these amazing bodies every second of the day, so we should definitely spend a good amount of time learning the science of how our body works!

After all, without our amazing skeleton, we couldn’t draw with chalk pastels, kick a soccer ball, or play musical instruments! 

What’s a skeleton’s favorite musical instrument? 
The trom-bone.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Skeletal System Activities For Kids

I’ve done a number of skeleton lessons and activities with my kids over the years. We’ve built skeletons out of Q-tips, drawn diagrams of the inside layers of bones, and done experiments to see what chemicals can soften bones (chicken bones, that is!). 

But this was our first time drawing a human skeleton with Nana. This art lesson was perfect for both my fifth grader and seventh grader. I love how students in various grades can adapt this lesson to their level. 

For instance, my fifth grader drew the entire skeleton and then labeled a portion of the skeleton. Younger students might find they need a little extra time to write all those bone names down. That is okay! You can take as much time as you need once the lesson is done to learn the names of each bone. We can either go back and label the rest of the skeleton, or maybe focus on learning just the portion he labeled. 

My seventh grader labeled the entire skeleton right after completing the drawing. This is the beauty of whole family learning with chalk pastel lessons: each student can work to their ability level, and the whole family comes away learning more about the skeleton no matter what! 

I appreciated how Nana’s chalk pastel skeleton lesson covers both the visual aspect of learning about the skeleton (because it’s just FUN to know how to draw a cool skeleton!), as well as the vocabulary element. 

Naming parts of a skeleton is great for building vocabulary. It’s useful know body part names, so you can speak articulately when visiting the doctor. I like how Nana sometimes adds in the “laymen’s term” for some of the bones, discussing the patella as also being called the “kneecap.”

Besides drawing a human skeleton, you can learn so much more about the human body with Nana’s other anatomy lessons. 

Diagram of an Ear 

the ear diagram for homeschool

This colorful lesson teaches kids the three main sections of the human ear. The ear is so intricate and students will learn how beautifully our ear is designed. 

Diagram of a Tooth

tooth diagram for homeschool

Simple to draw, this lesson shows kids all the layers of the tooth. We loved how the tooth is diagrammed in vivid colors to show all the parts of the tooth and gums! Nana’s humor really comes through in this lesson as she discusses each part of the tooth. Maybe it will inspire more dental hygiene as well!

Diagram of the Heart

STEAM learning in homeschool

This intricate lesson doesn’t shy away from detail. Young students will draw a beautiful human heart kids can admire and show off! All the parts are labeled, and this lesson would make a wonderful jumping off point for further study. 

Diagram of an Eye 

Homeschool Science

The eye looks so simple, but has so many parts we cannot see! Nana helps students draw both the outside of the eye and the inner workings of the eye. Plus, students can color their eye to match their own eye color.

Each of these human anatomy lessons involves a good amount of labeling, just like scientists do! These lessons could work at any point in your human anatomy studies:  They are perfect for a starting point for study. Spend your unit studying more about each part you labeled. 

Another way you could include these lessons is by having students complete their drawings in a science journal (because labeling a diagram is key to scientific research!). 

Or, make these lessons a final capstone to a unit on human anatomy. Let students use their drawing to explain what they have learned about human anatomy.

More Resources For Hands-On Science In Your Homeschool

hands on science resources for homeschool

In addition to the human skeleton lesson, the boys also completed the Advances in Medicine lesson. This lesson has kids draw another skeleton, but with extra fun details on the skeleton, and Nana includes some historical references in the lesson.

Hands on Science doesn’t stop with the human body! Nana has already created delightful lessons on cells, bacterium, as well as many other science topics. 

Do you have a space lover? They can draw all the planets in the solar system lessons, the moon missions, and all the exciting aspects of space exploration.

Nature lovers will enjoy any of the backyard nature art lessons, which include many animals. Or, try the many backyard birds lessons. How about a frog cycle lesson for spring?

For STEAM studies, paint pictures of famous inventors, and study their lives and inventions from telephones to electricity, steam engines and airplanes. 

There is science in everything we see and do! And here’s another skeleton joke for you: 

Why didn’t the skeleton go to the scary movie? 
He didn’t have the guts!

Sometimes, designing a program of science study for our kids feels like a scary movie. But learning about science is NOT scary at all with these wonderful chalk pastel art lessons to support your studies, and the delightful and energetic Nana leading your children through learning with art.

Don’t be afraid to blend art and science for a colorful hands-on experience for everyone. The human skeleton and our anatomy is a wonderful place to begin. 

Fill your homeschool with hands-on learning in every subject with a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse membership. This way you’ll have full access to all the video art lessons all the time! No matter what topic you’re studying, be it history, science, music, or literature, you can find a coordinating lesson to engage your learners. Plus, You ARE an Artist is always adding in valuable curriculum workbooks to give you fast facts, lesson planners, and more for your homeschool.

This collection of fun skeletal system activities for kids includes online lessons, fun facts, and hands-on projects.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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November Learning Activities For Your Homeschool: art, history, geography and more!

As November rolls around my mind immediately wanders to my long Thanksgiving grocery list. Every homeschool lesson feels like it revolves around pilgrims, Native Americans, turkey, and gratitude. Maybe you’ve created enough Tom the Turkey disguises every November he is now officially missing in action. Grab your chalk pastels, maps, some hot chocolate, your favorite stories, and find new inspiration with these November learning activities!

As November rolls around my mind immediately wanders to my long Thanksgiving grocery list. Every homeschool lesson feels like it revolves around pilgrims, Native Americans, turkey, and gratitude. Maybe you've created enough Tom the Turkey disguises every November he is now officially missing in action.  Grab your chalk pastels, maps, some hot chocolate, your favorite stories,  and find new inspiration with these November learning activities!
Looking for Thanksgiving art lessons and Draw Your Way Through the Thanksgiving Story? Find it all at the end of this post!

November Learning In Your Homeschool

Before your eyes glaze over with the joy of second third helpings of stuffing – who is counting? – there are many interesting historical dates besides the Mayflower, mapping opportunities other than Massachusetts, and writer’s birthdays to celebrate in the month of November.

November Exploration and Geography Study

100 years before the Pilgrims stepped on the Mayflower these navigators and discoveries were being documented. Grab a map and chalk these continents.

  • November 8, 1519 – Cortes conquered Mexico. After landing on the Yucatan Peninsula in April, Cortes and his troops had marched into the interior of Mexico to the Aztec capital and captured Aztec Emperor Montezuma.
  • November 19, 1493 – Puerto Rico was discovered by Columbus during his second voyage to the New World.
  • November 22, 1497 – Portuguese navigator Vasco Da Gama became the first to sail round the Cape of Good Hope, while searching for a sea route to India.
  • November 28, 1520 – Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan passed through the strait (of Magellan) located at the southern tip of South America, thus crossing from the Atlantic Ocean into the Pacific.

November for Religious Freedoms

November 10th 1483 – Reformation founder Martin Luther was born in Eisleben, Saxony. You don’t need any nails to add more Bible Crafts for Kids into your morning quiet time!

November in the Early Modern Era

  • November 3, 1534 – King Henry VIII became Supreme Head of the Church of England following the passage of the Act of Supremacy by Parliament.
  • November 17, 1558 – Queen Elizabeth I ascended the throne of England at the age of 25, reigning until 1603 when she was 69.

Learn About and Paint the 44 Countries in Europe

  • November 19th 1600 Charles I, King of Scotland and England was born. He ruled from 1625-49.
  • November 5th 1605 – Guy Fawkes Day in Britain, for the anniversary of the failed “Gunpowder Plot” to blow up the Houses of Parliament and King James I.
  • November 8th 1656 Astronomer and mathematician Edmund Halley was born in London. He sighted the Great Comet of 1682 (known now as Halley’s Comet) and foretold its reappearance in 1758.

Houston to Nana, can you hear us Nana? Draw your own comet and astronomy learning with Space Art Lessons.

  • November 26th 1694: – French author and philosopher Voltaire was born in Paris (as Francois-Marie Arouet). He was an advocate of human rights who published the Philosophical Letters in 1734. Other writings include; Zadig, The Century of Louis XIV, The Russian Empire under Peter the Great, The Philosophical Dictionary, and Essay on Morals.
  • November 26, 1607- Harvard College founder John Harvard was born in London.
  • November 1, 1700 – Charles II of Spain died and was succeeded by Philip V, resulting in the War of Spanish Succession.

November in Modern History

November 2 1734 American frontiersman Daniel Boone was born in Berks County, near Reading, Pennsylvania.

Daniel Boone’s birthday and Mapping Skills this month inspires us to learn more about early American history and the changes of the Unites States map. It’s also a great time to read about Lewis & Clark as well as the Oregon Trail.

November 10, 1775 – The U.S. Marine Corps was established as part of the U.S. Navy. It became a separate unit on July 11, 1789. We celebrate Veteran’s Day on November 11th.

Discover these Veterans Day Homeschool Activities

  • November 14th 1765 – Steamboat inventor Robert Fulton was born in rural Pennsylvania.
  • November 15, 1777 – The Articles of Confederation were adopted by Continental Congress.

American History Homeschool Lessons

  • Here are 7 American History Homeschool Lessons you’re students will enjoy.
  • November 17 1789 Photography inventor Louis Daguerre was born in Cormeilles, near Paris. In 1839 he announced his daguerreotype process, the first practical photographic process that produced lasting pictures.
  • November 17 1790 – German mathematician August Mobius was born in Schulpforte, Germany. He worked in the area of analytic geometry.
  • November 18th 1786German composer Carl Maria von Weber was born in Eutin, Germany. He founded the German romantic style of music. Best known for his operas including Der Freischutz.
  • November 21, 1783 The first free balloon flight took place in Paris as Jean Francois Pilatre de Rozier and Marquis Francois Laurent d’Arlandes ascended in a Montgolfier hot air balloon. The flight lasted 25 minutes and carried them nearly six miles at a height of about 300 feet over Paris.
  • November 22, 1718 – Blackbeard the pirate was killed off the coast of North Carolina after a prosperous “career”.
  • It’s never too late to enjoy the Talk Like a Pirate activities.
  • November 27, 1701 – Anders Celsius was born in Sweden. He invented the centigrade (Celsius) temperature scale commonly used in Europe.

Lively November Art Activities For Your Homeschool

November Art in Modern History

November 6, 1860 – Abraham Lincoln was elected as the 16th U.S. President and the first Republican. He received 180 of 303 possible electoral votes and 40 percent of the popular vote.
Learn more about the Presidents of the United States.



November 6th Birthdays:
1854: American conductor John Philip Sousa known for his rousing marches including: The Stars and Stripes Forever, Semper Fidelis, and El Capitan, was born in Washington, D.C.

  • 1860: Polish composer, pianist and patriot, Ignace Paderewski was born in Kurylowka, Podolia, Poland.
  • 1861: James Naismith, who invented the game of basketball, was born in Almonte, Ontario, Canada.

Are you homeschooling an athlete? Add the Games Clubhouse to your art lessons!

  • November 7th 1867 – Polish chemist Marie Curie was born in Warsaw, Poland. In 1903, she and her husband received the Nobel Prize for physics for their discovery of the element Radium.
  • November 8, 1895 – X-rays (electromagnetic rays) were discovered by Wilhelm Roentgen at the University of Wuerzburg in Germany.

Learn more about Inventors I Drew It Then I Knew It!

  • November 9, 1872 – The Great Boston Fire started in a dry-goods warehouse then spread rapidly destroying nearly 800 buildings.
  • November 10, 1871 – Explorer Henry M. Stanley found missionary David Livingstone at Ujiji, Africa.

Learn all 54 Countries in Africa by Painting the Map of The African Continent with Nana

  • November 12th 1840 French sculptor Auguste Rodin was born in Paris. Best known for his statues St. John the Baptist Preaching, Eve, The Age of Bronze and The Thinker.
  • November 14th, 1840 – Claude Monet was born in Rue Laffitte, Paris, France. Monet was the initiator and leading painter of the Impressionist style.


Listen to Nana’s Podcast, A Hands-On Homeschool Study Of Famous Artist Claude Monet

November 15, 1864 During the American Civil War, Union troops under General William T. Sherman burned Atlanta.

Find interesting art lessons in Civil War Hands On Homeschool Art Lessons and Workbook.

November 15, 1889Brazil became a republic.

Learn About and Paint the 12 Countries in South America


November 17, 1800 The U.S. Congress met for the first time in the new capital at Washington, D.C. President John Adams then became the first occupant of the Executive Mansion, later renamed the White House.

  • November 19, 1863President Abraham Lincoln delivered the 2 minute Gettysburg Address during ceremonies dedicating 17 acres of the Gettysburg Battlefield as a National Cemetery.

November 18th Birthdays:

  • 1836 Sir William Gilbert was born in London. He wrote the verses for the famed Gilbert and Sullivan comic operas which poked fun at the British establishment. Among their operas; H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance, Iolanthe, The Mikado and The Yeoman of the Guard.

The You ARE an ARTiST Homeschool Fine Arts Grade Five: for this level cover the instruments of the orchestra. Each week will have a specific instrument or composer to listen to and learn about.

  • 1860Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski was born in Kurylowka in southwestern Russia. He achieved world fame for his interpretations of Schubert and Chopin.
  • November 20th 1889American astronomer Edwin Hubble was born in Marshfield, Missouri. He pioneered the concept of an expanding universe. The Hubble Space Telescope was named in his honor. Sketch the Hubble Telescope in the Space Exploration Clubhouse!
  • November 26, 1832The first horse-drawn streetcar carried passengers in New York City along Fourth Avenue between Prince Street and 14th Street.
  • November 26th 1832 American physician and women’s rights leader, Mary Edwards Walker was born in Oswego, New York. She was the first female surgeon in U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War. She was captured and spent four months in a Confederate prison. In 1865, she became the first and only woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor.
  • November 1874 BirthdayWinston Churchill was born in Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire, England. His inspirational speeches, combined with his political skills and military strategy carried Britain through the war, and helped the Allies overcome the Nazi onslaught and defeat Hitler. This great British statesman found a source of delight and a relief from the stress of his career. He proudly painted in oils and pastel chalks, producing over 550 paintings, helping him to hone his powers of observation, memory and visual acuity.

November in the 1900’s


November 4, 1922 British archaeologist Howard Carter and his workmen discover a step leading to the tomb of King Tutankhamen in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt.

In November we chat a lot about American History, but take some time to Explore Ancient Egypt with Chalk Pastels!

  • November 7, 1944 – President Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected to an unprecedented fourth term, defeating Thomas E. Dewey. Roosevelt died less than a year later on April 12, 1945.
  • November 7, 1990 – Mary Robinson became Ireland’s first female president.
  • November 7, 1918 – Christian evangelist Billy Graham was born near Charlotte, North Carolina.
  • November 7 1922 Pioneering heart surgeon Christiaan Barnard was born in Beaufort West, Cape of Good Hope Province, South Africa. He headed the surgical team that achieved the first-ever human heart transplant in 1967.

Learn more about anatomy with Nana’s Heart Diagram

  • November 9, 1989 – The Berlin Wall was opened up after standing for 28 years as a symbol of the Cold War. The 27.9 mile wall had been constructed in 1961.
  • November 10, 1928 – Hirohito was crowned Emperor of Japan. He was Imperial Japan’s Emperor during World War II.

Learn all 48 countries in Asia by chalking them!

November 13, 1927 – The Holland Tunnel was opened to traffic. The tunnel runs under the Hudson River between New York City and Jersey City and was the first underwater tunnel built in the U.S.

  • November 13, 1956 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation on public buses was unconstitutional.
  • November 14th 1900 – American composer Aaron Copland was born in Brooklyn, New York. He created a quintessential American music style in his ballets, film scores, and orchestral works including Fanfare for the Common Man, Rodeo, and Appalachian Spring for which he won a Pulitzer Prize.
  • Celebrate the ballet with a beautiful scene from the Nutcracker. (Did you know Nana has a series of Nutcracker lessons plus a Nutcracker I Drew It Then I Knew It Guide?)
  • November 19-20, 1990 The Cold War came to an end during a summit in Paris as leaders of NATO and the Warsaw Pact signed a Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe.
  • November 22, 1963 In downtown Dallas, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated.
  • November 22 1913British composer Benjamin Britten was born in Lowestoft, Suffolk, England. Best known for his operas including Peter Grimes, A Ceremony of Carols, and War Requiem.

November 29, 1929American explorer Richard Byrd and Bernt Balchen completed the first airplane flight to the South Pole. Paint a Map of Antarctica.

November Writers’ Birthdays

November is packed full of wonderful authors’ birthdays. We believe in the Power of Adding Art to Literature Studies.
November 8 1847Dracula author Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, Ireland.

Chalk these Halloween Homeschool Spooky Art Activities and be sure to check out the Homeschool Nature Study’s Bat Nature Study.

  • November 11th 1821 – Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born in Moscow. Best known for The Brothers Karamazov, Crime and Punishment and The Idiot.
  • November 13th 1850 – Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. Best known for Treasure Island, Kidnapped and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Create a Treasure Island masterpiece from the Talk Like a Pirate Day post.
  • November 28th 1757 – British artist and poet William Blake was born in London.
  • November 29th 1832 – Little Women author Louisa May Alcott was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Is Little Women a favorite read in your home? Read this Little Women Unit Study for Your Homeschool .

November 29th 1898 British author C.S. Lewis was born in Belfast, Ireland (as Clive Staples Lewis). He wrote books on Christian teachings including The Pilgrim’s Regress, The Problem of Pain, Miracles, and The Screwtape Letters.

I am in my mid 40’s and I’ll never forget my third grade teacher reading the Narnia books to class every morning. I loved reading the books to my boys. Add art to these lovely stories with The Chronicles of Narnia: A Homeschool Art Adventure.

  • November 30th 1835American author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910) was born in Florida, Missouri. He wrote books under the pen name Mark Twain including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and The Prince and the Pauper.
  • November 7th 1900Gone with the Wind author Margaret Mitchell was born in Atlanta, Georgia.
Charlie Brown Thanksgiving Art Activities

Additional Seasonal Art Activities and November Learning Activities

Are we at the mashed potatoes and gravy part yet?!? Here are a few awesome Thanksgiving art tutorials you can share with the kiddos while you peel potatoes and stuff the bird. What a fun way to share Chalk Pastel Art with visiting relatives this holiday.

  • Norman Rockwell Thanksgiving – How would you like to visit with famous artist Norman Rockwell, known as “America’s Artist” while he paints one of his most iconic scenes from the “Four Freedoms” series: Freedom from Want! Yep, you will sit at a festive Thanksgiving table, set with the best china, the best dinner guests and have a happy time? Come on, that turkey leg looks like it is all yours!
  • Thanksgiving Hymn Favorites: Learning Activities for Your Homeschool – A season of thankfulness and gratitude would not be complete without sharing thanks to God for all of our blessings. One of our favorite ways to celebrate during this time of Thanksgiving is with hymn studies. Many songs help us to remember our gifts and sing our gratitude to God. Here, I’ve included Thanksgiving hymn favorites for you to enjoy, along with learning activities for your homeschool.
  • Thanksgiving Day Parade – Nana has a really fun way to paint your favorite, giant Thanksgiving float in her Thanksgiving Clubhouse series.
  • The Ultimate Guide to Fun Thanksgiving Activities for Your Homeschool – Enjoy this ultimate guide to fun Thanksgiving activities for your homeschool with wonderful homeschool tools for celebrating Thanksgiving and teaching gratitude. Includes art activities, history, Thanksgiving recipes and more!
These November learning activities make education come alive in your homeschool. Includes lessons with art, history geography and more!

We are incredibly thankful for you!

Stef Layton

Stef started homeschooling her boys in 2008. She quickly adopted a hands-on learning homeschool style and graduated her oldest tactile learner in 2021. Stef started the Hands-On Learning column in Homeschooling Today magazine. The Laytons currently reside in the foothills of Colorado where Stef also teaches yoga. The family loves to hike trails, stand-up paddle board, and chase sunsets. Stef shares travel and homeschool tips on IG at @LaytonAdventures.

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Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Hey, did you hear? Nana has a homeschool science ear diagram activity! This activity is a perfect way to learn the inner workings of the human ear while being creative and a bit messy with chalk pastels.

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear - Hey, did you hear? Nana has a homeschool science ear diagram activity! This activity is a perfect way to learn the inner workings of the human ear while being creative and a bit messy with chalk pastels! #chalkpastels #YouAREAnArtist #homeschhool

Learning About Human Anatomy Made Easy: Diagram the Ear

I love incorporating art into our homeschool studies! It gives us a tactile way to explore information, and for my kinesthetic learner, it helps solidify what he’s learning. This year my high schooler is studying biology. And wouldn’t you know it, Nana has chalk pastels that fit with his course of study! Colorful diagrams are a perfect way to help my teen visualize what he’s learning in a hands-on way.

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Diagram The Ear With This Homeschool Study


Nana’s online video art lessons provide you with all the information you need to create a vibrant diagram. This week my son learned about the inner workings of the ear! All we needed was a pack of construction paper and a starter set of chalk pastels as Nana took us step-by-step on how to draw the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. Then she proceeded to show us how to label each part of the ear diagram correctly.

I love that I could pair Nana’s chalk pastel with our biology textbook! Chalk pastels can be a wonderful compliment to any homeschool curriculum.

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Additional Resources For Science In your Homeschool


Nana has loads of homeschool science resources to keep the learning going. When you have a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse Membership; you’ll have access to over 800 video art lessons. Or you can find all the science lessons in the I Drew It Then I Knew It series!

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Homeschool Anatomy & Biology

Homeschool Chemistry & Physics

  • Inventors Clubhouse (includes the following)
  • Fulton steamboat
  • Henry Ford automobile
  • Nikola Tesla electricity
  • Wright brothers airplane
  • Light Prism – Sir Isaac Newton
  • Benjamin Franklin and electricity
  • Steam railroad engine
  • Samuel Morse telegraph
  • Thomas Edison’s light bulb
  • Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone

Homeschool Astronomy

Homeschool Botany

Plus so much more!

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

Homeschool Anatomy Study: Diagram The Ear

No matter what your kiddo may be studying, Nana has a corresponding lesson that can solidify the knowledge in a hands-on way. And I, for one, love the colorful diagrams that pair so beautifully with our homeschool lessons.

Erin is a writer, blogger, and homeschooler to two intense kids. Her blog is filled with information to help you explore a child led education while making meaningful connections with your children. Discover favorite read alouds, seasonal books, games, art projects, hands-on activities, and learn to just breathe through the ups and downs of life. She loves nature, farm life, good books, knitting, new pens, and hot coffee. Erin is a contributing writer for Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers. Her work has also been featured on Simple Homeschool and Book Shark.

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A Tooth Diagram Activity For Homeschool Science That Will Make You Smile

Here is a tooth diagram activity for homeschool science that will make you smile! There probably aren’t two people who love smiles more than a dentist… and a teacher! As homeschool parents, we envision ourselves leading our children into learning with bright smiles on all our faces. 

Enjoying learning is as important as reaching your learning objective or picking the perfect read-aloud. We want kids to come to learning with a happy curiosity. We want them to leave with a smile of satisfaction. 

Some learning practices are tailor-made to create enjoyable moments of learning. Using chalk pastels has always worked to perk up my children from the doldrums of copywork or chores. 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Hands-On Homeschool Anatomy

Perhaps you’ve heard learning sticks better when multiple senses are involved.

If kids listen to a lecture, they activate their hearing sense only.

If they read a PowerPoint or watch a video while listening, now they’ve involved their sight as well.

If they listen, read, and recite, that’s three senses! And three more chances for the learning to get in!

But don’t forget the most tactile sense of all – using our hands to move, shape, and create as we learn! Adding this fourth layer of sensory exploration to the learning time engages nearly the whole body, as kids get to select colors, sketch lines, and really engage fully with the concepts in front of them. 

Hands-on learning moves children from passively accepting information to active inquiry as they explore with their fingers, eyes, and ears!

When it comes to learning about anatomy, using your hands to create is a fantastic way to show kids how their body is at work for them! Isn’t it great that we actual have a living specimen to study anatomy with: our own bodies! 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Online Tooth Diagram Activity For Your Homeschool

Studying the teeth is an important topic to include in an anatomy lesson. For one, they are a prominent body feature. Also, kids have all kinds of experiences with teeth: smiling, eating, talking, brushing, and… visiting the dentist! Or even getting a visit from the Tooth Fairy!

But, have your kids ever explored the inner world of the tooth? Most kids view of teeth is a simple white molar shape. Below the surface, teeth have so much more going on. You will find that out with Nana’s tooth diagram activity!

online video art lessons

Nana’s chalk pastel video art lesson of the Diagram of a Tooth highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. 

Kids will love tracing the outline of the tooth first, because it activates prior knowledge. Everyone knows what a tooth looks like on the outside. 

Then Nana goes deeper to show students all the layers: pellicle, enamel, dentin, pulp, cementum. As students draw each layer in different colors, it is interesting to see how Nana adds texture to help them visualize each part. Plus they can start to see the relative thickness and size of each layer as well. 

homeschool science lessons
homeschool art lessons for all ages
Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Soon, kids will have drawn a rainbow diagram of the tooth. Then, like the budding scientists they are becoming, they will label each part. This is a wonderful opportunity to add some vocabulary to their word banks, spelling lists, or handwriting worksheets!

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!
Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

When we completed this lesson, our young exchange student from Spain was staying with us. He enjoyed learning all kinds of new English vocabulary as well as understanding more about tooth anatomy. It just goes to show you how accessible Nana’s chalk pastel lessons are, when even an English language learner can easily enjoy them!

Finally, like any good artist, they can name, sign, and date their work of art: the human tooth! This is sure to be a stunning addition to any bulletin board or art journal. They will barely realize they have tucked away a lot of science and anatomy knowledge, because the journey of painting with chalk pastels is so enjoyable. 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Additional Resources For Homeschool Science

Don’t stop with the tooth! Nana has a host of homeschool science resources to keep the learning going. When you have a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse Membership, all of these lessons and the I Drew It Then I Knew It series are at your fingertips all year!

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Homeschool Anatomy & Biology

Homeschool Chemistry & Physics

Homeschool Astronomy

Homeschool Botany

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Whatever your budding scientist wants to discover, there’s sure to be an exciting and colorful chalk pastel lesson to make your homeschool hands-on when it comes to science! Make the learning fun and the learning will stick – and everyone walks away smiling!

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Why STEAM Learning Matters In Your Homeschool

STEAM learning has become a popular topic in education today. The good news is, a STEAM approach to learning can add creativity and innovation to your child’s education. This summary of STEAM learning includes ideas and resources for how to easily and effectively incorporate it into your homeschool.

STEAM learning in homeschool

What Is STEAM?

STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art & Math. It is essentially an integrated learning model designed to help children think more globally and problem solve.

Using STEAM education results in students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. These are the innovators, educators, leaders, and learners of the 21st century! 

Arts Integration.com – “What is a STEAM Education?”

A STEAM approach encourages students to ask questions and think creatively. It is also a great way to help children who typically shy away from topics related to mathematics and technology to engage and learn in a different way!

STEAM Learning

STEAM vs. STEM Learning

STEM learning was a precursor to the STEAM approach. STEM included fundamental subjects including science, technology, engineering, and math. However, in recent years, STEM has been replaced with STEAM.

This is because adding the “A” for art not only fosters increased creativity in these areas, it also supports innovative and more out of the box thinking. Educators report that it is the art component that removes perceived limitations and allows students to fully immerse themselves in more integrated learning.

Homeschool Science

Why STEAM Learning Matters In Your Homeschool

Intentionally adding STEAM learning in your homeschool can be a game changer. Because it creates a more integrated approach to the subjects of study, your child explores and creates in ways that go far beyond a typical worksheet or textbook.

Research shows that STEAM Learning provides the following critical benefits to students:

  • Exposure to the creative process
  • Increases critical thinking
  • Introduces unique problem solving options
  • Provides hands-on learning experiences
  • Shows an increased value and appreciation of the arts

These benefits are just as true for your child and your homeschool!

In my own homeschool, I have found that taking this type of approach has made a significant difference in helping my son think critically, particularly in the area of science and technology. While these two subjects tend to be a bit intimidating for him, weaving art into the various topics allows him to feel connected to the information in a new way.

Moreover, because the learning is more accessible, I find that he not only comprehends more, he retains more as well. We even use a hands-on, STEAM approach in testing!

STEAM learning in homeschool

Examples Of STEAM Learning In Our Homeschool

It can be intimidating to think about adding STEAM into our homeschool days. My experience has been that it’s much easier than I thought. Here are some examples of how STEAM has naturally become a part of my son’s learning.

  1. When my son was studying electricity as part of his science curriculum, we completed a lesson on inventors that used art to depict various scientific discoveries.
  2. As part of our human anatomy study, we are enjoying a hands-on lesson on the human heart, complete with diagramming and art woven throughout.
  3. Our astronomy study included artistic representations of the planets, super nova, and the night sky.
  4. When learning about measurement in math, we used painters tape on the sidewalk outside to physically show the difference between a foot and a meter.

While the idea of STEAM sounds complicated and formal, the reality is that it is actually a much more flexible and child centric way to homeschool. My son loves being able to create as he studies, and I love that he is more successful with the learning because of it.

STEAM learning in homeschool

Resources For STEAM Learning At Home

As I said, I know that STEAM learning can feel a little overwhelming at first for parents. It doesn’t have to be! The beauty of STEAM learning is that it is integrated. This means you cover multiple subjects in just one lesson.

You ARE An Artist has a wide variety of options for creating a STEAM approach in your homeschool (and make it easy on you!). Take a look at a some of the possibilities:

This hands-on homeschool STEAM approach is just the beginning, Chalk Pastel Art offers a variety of STEAM activities your kids will love!

For More Information About STEAM Learning In Your Homeschool.

Why Combine Art and Academics?
How We Use Art as an Alternative to Testing
Homeschool Science and Art Curriculum Match Up

Shawna Wingert, Different By Design Learning

Shawna Wingert is a special education teacher turned writer, speaker and consultant. She is also a homeschooling mom of two brilliant boys with differences and special needs.  Shawna has written four books for parents – Everyday Autism, Special Education at Home, Parenting Chaos and her latest, Homeschooling Your Child With Special Needs. She helps parents of children with learning differences, behavioral challenges and special needs every day at DifferentByDesignLearning.com.

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Human Heart Activity For Kids: Hands-On Homeschool Science

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It’s a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

“Where science does not teach a child to wonder and admire it has perhaps no educative value.”

Charlotte Mason, Philosophy of Education, p. 224

The Value Of Hands-On Science In Your Homeschool

Science is multi-faceted.  It manifests itself in multiple ways and is captivating. Have you ever watched a child carefully observe living science? Every day, the natural world sends delightful invitations, asking one to unwrap all the tiny miracles it offers. At tender ages, before a budding learner carries the ability to read or write, their senses allow them to appreciate the wonders set before them. A child’s curiosity ignites as a spider’s web catches tiny droplets of rain, mirroring an array of fresh morning dew. 

Hands on science with snails

Their thoughts awaken as tentacles shyly emerge, uncovering the secrets of what lies inside their delicate shell.  Learning  sparks  as a  butterfly emerges from its chrysalis, spreading its newborn wings for the very first time.

A brainstorm (as my son calls it) happens when an experiment calls for creating clouds or discovering the wavelengths of light.  

Implementing hands-on homeschool science cultivates the thirst to learn and encourages critical thinking skills. With careful nurturing, a child is able to carry these special learning experiences with them as they grow. Simply put, science fosters life-long learning and is interdisciplinary in nature.

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

Human Heart Activity For Kids

Let’s step into four important chambers to uncover one of Nana’s newest interdisciplinary science lessons! This one will surely get your blood pumping.  At the heart of this study is a beautiful presentation of one of the most vital organs of the human body.

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

Nana’s human heart anatomy highlights science, art, writing, diagramming, and an exposure to brand new vocabulary; a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

This wonderful homeschool art lesson in intriguing to young anatomists and is an engaging way to capture the heart of the human body.

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

More Resources For Hands-On Science

Delightful art brings a beauty to our home, and attached to each masterpiece is a measure of pleasant memories filled with the sweet smells of Nana’s apple pie and busy little hands covered in rich colors. This memorable learning goes beyond just the art lessons.

Art with Nana shares one of the most important pieces of home education, learning alongside my children.  We have had so much fun and created such colorful memories with many of Chalk Pastel Art’s science resources. They all pair well with any science curricula, unit studies, and books!

More resources for hands on science

Do you have an astronomer who is interested in unlocking the mysteries of the universe? Check out Nana’s and Tricia’s astronomy lessons! These paintings take you deep into space focusing on the solar system. Hands-on and multi-sensory, the fascinating art brings a stunning demonstration of the world beyond our galaxies.

We coupled the art lessons with You ARE an ARTiST’s kid-friendly Companion Workbook. This guide is easy to use, organized, and packed with wonderful information relating to the solar system.  The Five Facts and NASA links were our favorite pieces in the Companion Workbook. If you are interested in building an engaging solar system study, combine the Companion Workbook with a few books from the provided booklist. Then add the art lessons that are out of this world!

If you have an anatomist on your hands, take a look at these art lessons that go perfectly with a human body unit! Filled with lots of color, vocabulary, and labeling, your anatomist will take a sneak peek into the wonders inside the eye in a Microscopic Science Study and bacterium with Small But Mighty Cell Activities For Your Homeschool.

Spend a few moments outdoors looking at the spread of colors sprinkled across the woodlands. Enjoy plant life with your future botanist by observing a few flowers. Then, draw your sweet nature time to a close by painting with Nana. This art lesson will bring your naturalist such pleasure by drawing and labeling the parts of a bright daffodil.

Do you have a student who just can’t wait to  explore marine life? If so, you might want to spend time putting your feet in the sand and listening to the rhythmic waves with Nana! With a Majestic Ocean Study, she will take your marine biologist along sandy beaches to build sand castles and uncover the fascinating life beyond the sea! Bring your sand buckets and all colorful pastels!

Nana’s human heart activity for kids is a great hands-on homeschool science experience that highlights art, writing, diagramming, plus an exposure to brand new vocabulary. It's a combination of multiple subjects all in one spot!

All the hands-on homeschool science fun doesn’t end here! It’s just the beginning! Chalk Pastel Art offers many art adventures that combine perfectly with all ages and with any hands on science activity. Check out all the wonderful ways art coupled with science can work in your family with this Science and Art: A STEAM Curriculum Match Up.

Jamie Gault

Jamie is the author of A Brown Bear’s Language Arts Study, a literature-inspired homeschool mom of eight, and a former educator. She enjoys a bookshelf bursting with colorful picture books  and children’s stories of all genres. Indulging in a read aloud with all of her children around her is one of Jamie’s favorite moments of her days. Be sure to find Jamie on Instagram and visit her blog, Treasuring the Tiny Moments Homeschool, to be encouraged by all her learning adventures with her wonderful family.

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Small But Mighty Cell Activities For Your Homeschool

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. In fact, online cellular biology lessons are an excellent addition for your homeschool science. Take a look!

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

When it comes to making learning fun, homeschool parents don’t have to look far. Kids are fascinated with what makes them…well, them! They love to see the inner workings of things. What is more intricate and endlessly fascinating than the human body? 

Cells are like mini-worlds unto themselves. They make up our very existence, yet they exist beyond our eyesight. This whole “universe” of cells is a captivating world to explore through hands-on activities like experiments, crafts, and art! Consider these small but mighty cell activities as you plan your homeschool science curriculum. 

Make Learning About Cells Fun

What’s more hands-on than the human body? We all have one, right? Kids will be engaged by what they can learn by simply observing their own body. When our family studied human anatomy, my boys loved that they used their bodies as part of the experiments and activities. 

Yet as much as we can observe so much of the human body’s wonder from the outside, it’s a million times more astounding to consider what goes on at the cellular level! 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Cell Activities For Your Homeschool

Want to give your kids insight into the microscopic world beyond our sight, but right below our skin (and on and in it too!)?

  • Enlarge the cell
  • Model the cell
  • Watch the cell in action
  • Draw the cell
These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Enlarge the cell.

You probably eat single cells for breakfast! Yes, a chicken egg starts out as a single cell. Show your child an egg, and explain to them the simple parts of a cell: the cell wall, membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus can all be “seen” in a cracked egg!

Model the cell.

Now that kids have a sense of the major parts of a cell, dive deeper into some of the smaller pieces. In our study of cells, we created an edible cell using gelatin and candies. So fun and delicious. You’ll need a package of jello, a bowl, and a variety of small candies to represent the organelles (parts of a cells) like the mitochondria, golgi bodies, ribosomes, and more. 

You can find a detailed edible cell model to follow here

jello model for homeschool cell activities

Watch cells in action.

Show your kids the “cellular highway” of capillaries and veins that your blood cells travel on. One quick (and to my boys, humorous) way to do this is by shining a flashlight under their tongues while they look in a mirror. There, they will spot a “roadmap” of multicolored veins that give a glimpse of how special cells like blood cells travel around the body!

We even made a model of the blood using corn syrup, candy red hots, and candy sprinkles. Have you kids mix this up to see how various cells are different sizes and how they travel through plasma. 

Draw the cell.

In Nana’s newest I Drew It Then I Knew It series, kids get hands on with science by painting and labeling a diagram of some of our smallest parts! 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Online Cellular Biology Lessons Perfect For Your Homeschool Study

Whether you’re studying human body cells, plant cells, or the chemical makeup of our world, these science art lessons will fit your homeschool science. 

Nana has included a wonderful “opener” lesson in her Lab Coated Scientist class. My oldest created a painting of a scientist researching in a book, with swirling scientific symbols above his head. While this scientist is drawn as a chemistry teacher by Nana, my oldest changed the book to read “Biology” to match our current science studies. He replaced Nana’s chemical notations with a DNA strand and a bacterium! Kids can be so creative with these lessons. 

This scientist painting would be perfect to have as a cover for any note booking or portofolio of your child’s work. 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Diagram A Cell

After doing some of the hands-on activities above, have your child paint and Diagram a Cell. Nana does a wonderful job of helping students visualize the cell through their chalk pastel “microscope” as they look for the cytoplasm, nucleus, mitochondria, and cell membrane. If your students have learned other parts of the cell, why not have them include this knowledge into their drawing as well. This video art lesson is the perfect choice to add to a science journal or notebooking collection. 

Diagram Bacterium

The colorful Diagram of a Bacterium lesson helps kids learn about another kind of cell that can be lurking in your body. Whether harmful or helpful, bacteria exists everywhere, and yet is a different kind of cell than what makes up your body structure. After this lesson, kids can discuss proper hygiene (here’s a free hand washing printable you can use!), proper nutrition (talk about probiotics in their yogurt!), and discuss which kinds of bacteria are harmful or helpful.

diagram of bacterium
These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Diagram of an Eye

Diagram of an Eye helps students learn the various parts of the eye. What is special about this lessons is how students get to label the eye as we see it, and as it looks from inside the body!

Biology and Chemistry

DaVinci’s Vetruvian Man painting makes a great finish to a series on the human body. This makes a wonderful lesson in the proportions of both artwork and the human body. As you sketch out the  dive into the concept held by this Old Master that “everything is connected.” Our cells are microscopic, but work together to create a larger system. In the same way, people are smaller parts of God’s much larger universe. 

The Light Prism with Sir Isaac Newton lesson would be a fantastic intro lesson for studying chemistry and physics. Is it so beautifully colorful and symmetrical, you will want to frame this artwork after your kids create it!

For additional scientific artwork, try the Daffodil lesson where kids will paint a gorgeous yellow daffodil with their chalks and label the parts of a flower. You might revisit your cell painting and discuss how a plant cell is slightly different than an animal/human cell. 

More Homeschool Science Lessons From You Are An Artist

Science doesn’t end with the human body, of course. Our boys have enjoyed so many science lessons from Chalk Pastel. 

For a great Astronomy study, the Hubble Space Telescope Lesson can be a jumping off point for a Space unit. Follow it up with any of the Space Exploration Clubhouse lessons, but my favorites would be the Spiral Galaxy and the Nebula lessons. Students can draw all the planets in the Milky Way with the Solar System Clubhouse lessons. 

If you’re studying Physics, you should check out the Electric Light and Electric Lightning lessons!

For an Earth Science study, you’ll love the volcano, tornado, and northern lights video art lessons. 

Studying habitats? Draw a Marsh or paint the habitat Under the Sea

A study of Zoology might use any of the dozens of animal art lessons from Nana. Frogs are always a great place to start because they are a great animal for discussing life cycles. The John James Audubon lesson plus the Birds Clubhouse lessons are also wonderful for Biology and Zoology studies. 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Each science-themed art lesson from Nana focuses on a science concept that opens a door for further investigation, study, and discussion. Nana does such a wonderful job of dropping “breadcrumbs” of interesting and relevant facts as she gives her chalk pastel instruction. 

I am always amazed at how much a simple painting session can spark a deeper level conversation with my boys. Even if you only select a single video art lesson to complement your science studies, these lessons are small but mighty cell activities you’ll want to include in your homeschool science!

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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A Microscopic World Study For Homeschool Science

Homeschool Science

Science, it’s one of those love-it-or-hate-it subjects in homeschooling. Teaching homeschool science and facilitating experiments at home might make you feel a little overwhelmed. There are so many exciting ways to teach and learn about science together at home.  This microscopic world study is a great example!

An excellent way to get your children excited about science can be through exploring the microscopic world. #homeschoolscience #microscopicstudy #sciencecurriculum #sciencestudy

Seeing Our World Through The Microscope

An excellent way to get your children excited about science can be through exploring the microscopic world. Seeing things through a microscope opens a whole new world of scientific knowledge for children. 

Since most children have a visual or kinesthetic (hands-on) learning style, studying with microscopes and diagramming is an excellent way to learn science. Not only that, it’s a lot of fun! 

So if homeschool science experiments aren’t your thing yet, you should try an exploration of the microscopic world. Your kids are sure to love it and learn so much along the way. 

Homeschool Science

The best part is that you don’t even need a microscope at home to enjoy these studies. If you have one handy, that’s awesome! But don’t fret if you don’t. Nowadays, you can effortlessly search for what you want to see through a microscopic lens, and you can likely find images and even videos of it on the internet. 

You may want to set up a microscopic world study and look closely at all of these marvelous things the human eye can not see. There are many options to explore under a microscope, insects, cells, salt, hair, onion, mold, flower parts, leaves, sea sponge, spider webs, pond water, and tons more!

Homeschool Science

Microscopic World Study And Exploration For Your Homeschool

If you are ready to embark on a scientific journey with Nana, she is waiting with some unique new lessons that are sure to please. Nana has created the perfect homeschool science art lessons to add an artistic and hands-on element to your science studies. Who says science is boring? It’s definitely not with Nana in the I Drew It Then I Knew It Clubhouse. 

We love how YOU ARE AN ARTiST keeps adding fun hands-on art lessons to pair with everything we are learning in our homeschools. (If you don’t have a membership yet, I highly recommend adding one to your homeschool. You will get so much value from it for almost every subject in your homeschool, including science.) It’s one of my favorite ways to keep our homeschool fun and exciting for all of my kids. 

Homeschool Science

So whether you have a complete science curriculum or no science curriculum at all, you can use these hands-on homeschool science lessons. You can pair these microscopic homeschool science diagramming lessons with your science curriculum. Or use a resource that allows you to explore your particular interests and pair Nana’s homeschool science lessons with them! Either way, these are easy to do, and your kids will be so glad that you did. 

Nana loves maps, and diagramming is like maps for anatomy and cells. Combining art and science by diagramming is brilliant because you can also expand on vocabulary, handwriting, and spelling for elementary. 

Homeschool Science

Diagram of a Cell 

There are many creative ways to learn about cells for all ages, and this Diagram of a Cell art lesson is perfect as a stand-alone lesson or to accompany that cell cake or cells made of jello. It’s a wonderful way to learn more about cells, and if you don’t like all the messy aspects of cell cakes and the like, you can just stick with paper and chalk pastels.

Homeschool Science

Diagram of a Bacterium

Another easy way to learn more about homeschool science is to add a Diagram of a Bacterium art lesson. Learning about science through text or your curriculum is great but adding a hands-on element like art boosts your kids’ science knowledge. 

Diagram of the Eye & Eyeball 

My kids loved this one! Diagramming the eye is such an exciting way to bring your science lesson to life! We added the DK Smithsonian Human Body Book to our science studies; it has fantastic images to explore as you learn together. It is one of those resources that are great to use in place of an entire science curriculum if you haven’t chosen one yet or to allow the kids to find their own interests to pursue. 

Homeschool Science

Diagram of a Daffodil

The Diagram of a Daffodil was also a favorite in our homeschool this week! We love to explore nature, and combining art makes it even more delightful. It is always a treat to revisit the parts of a flower and we included Julia Rothman’s Nature Anatomy book for this one too!

Homeschool Science

More Online Homeschool Science Lessons

Here are even more homeschool art lessons you can add to your homeschool science studies. Remember, there is no right or wrong way to study anything. Keep it simple and have fun learning together!

  • Vitruvian Man – Leonardo da Vinci
  • Light Prism – Sir Isaac Newton
  • Lab-Coated Scientist
  • Total Solar Eclipse
  • Solar System 
  • Perseids
  • Through the Telescope
  • Moon Missions
  • Comet 
  • Spiral Galaxy
  • and many, many more!
Homeschool Science

Nature Science Art Lessons

  • Red-Eyed Tree Frog
  • Snail 
  • Deer in the Forest
  • Rat Snake
  • Eagle’s Nest
  • Dandelion
  • Ant
  • Cicada
  • Sharks

Courtney is a Jesus-pursuing, native Texan, homeschool mom of three, and she believes homeschooling can be a peaceful and productive rhythm. At Grace, Grow & Edify she helps families create peaceful homeschooling atmospheres through faith, organizational strategies, and cultivating strong roots at home. She is also the founder of Homeschool Mastery Academy.

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This Homeschool Moon Unit Study Is Out Of This World

Moon activities, books, and fun art lessons for all ages! Learn about moon phases and more with this homeschool moon unit study!

This Homeschool Moon Unit Study Is Out Of This World: Moon activities, books, and fun art lessons for all ages! Learn about moon phases and more with this homeschool moon unit study! #moonunit #moonactivities #moonunitstudy #phasesofthemoon #onlinehomeschoollessons #moonphaseunitstudy

Studying The Moon As Part Of Your Homeschool Science


Did you know that the moon is the Earth’s natural satellite? How about that the moon controls the Earth’s tides? There is much you can learn about the moon with a  Moon Unit Study.

I always like to start a new interest by strewing a few books and hands-on activities. Then I’ll look for any corresponding art lessons because my kids LOVE art!

For books, I chose:

  • The Usborne Book of the Moon
  • Faces of the Moon
  • The Moon Book by Gail Gibbons
  • Magic Treehouse: Midnight on the Moon

I grabbed some loose parts and our 2021-2022 Moon Phase Calendar. Then I checked our You ARE An Artist Clubhouse Membership for Moon-related art lessons!

Online art lessons for your homeschool with all sorts of hands-on activities


Phases Of The Moon Homeschool Activities


The tastiest part of our moon unit study was using Oreos to show the different phases of the moon! The Moon Mission: Heading to the Moon chalk pastel lesson looked like a moon phase, so we incorporated it into our moon study. All we needed for this art lesson was a piece of black construction paper and a cheap set of chalk pastels! Nana walked us through how to create our giant moon with an itty bitty rocket headed its way!

We also used some of our circular loose parts to simulate how the Earth revolves around the Sun while the moon revolves around the Earth. At first, it was difficult for my daughter to understand how the moon could keep moving around the Earth even as the Earth moved around the Sun, but by showing her the loose parts, she soon understood perfectly!

This Homeschool Moon Unit Study Is Out Of This World


Online Homeschool Lessons For Your Moon Unit Study


Then, we discovered more moon art lessons! My favorite was the full moon!

With the You ARE An Artist Complete Clubhouse Membership, you’ll have access to all of Nana’s chalk pastel moon lessons, including:

  • Moon Missions: Heading to the Moon
  • A Simple Start in Chalk Pastels: Harvest Moon Nocturne
  • Nature Art Lessons: Full Moon
This Homeschool Moon Unit Study Is Out Of This World

You’ll also have these additional moon and space lessons to choose from:

Moon Missions Video Art Lessons

  • Pad Crawler
  • Saturn 5 Lift Off
  • Astronaut with Flag
  • Mission Control
  • Footprint on the Moon
  • Astronaut Helmet with Earth Reflection

11 Solar System Video Art Course Tutorials

  • Mercury
  • Venus
  • Earth
  • Solar Eclipse
  • Mars
  • Jupiter
  • Saturn
  • Uranus
  • Neptune
  • The Plutoids
  • The Solar System

6 Space Exploration Video Art Course Tutorials

  • Man on the Moon
  • Spiral Galaxy
  • Nebula
  • Comet
  • Night Sky – Big and Little Dipper
  • Space Shuttle Lift Off
  • Plus much more!
This Homeschool Moon Unit Study Is Out Of This World


Additional Resources For Space Exploration In Your Homeschool


Did you know that each full moon has a different name? My daughter loved learning the terms of the various full moons. She was particularly fond of the Pink moon, which is in April, and the Wolf moon, which is in January!

Here are some additional resources for learning more about the moon and space that we enjoyed on our “out of this world” adventure:

This Homeschool Moon Unit Study Is Out Of This World

Homeschool Moon Unit Study

A moon study can be fun and engaging when adding art and hands-on activities to compelling books! Then, pick a night to step outside with your kids and see the wonder of our natural satellite for yourself!

This Homeschool Moon Unit Study and moon phases calendar

Erin is a writer, blogger, and homeschooler to two intense kids. Her blog is filled with information to help you explore a child led education while making meaningful connections with your children. Discover favorite read alouds, seasonal books, games, art projects, hands-on activities, and learn to just breathe through the ups and downs of life. She loves nature, farm life, good books, knitting, new pens, and hot coffee. Erin is a contributing writer for Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers. Her work has also been featured on Simple Homeschool and Book Shark.